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Ethiopia: Information on civilians, particularly in Addis Ababa, who have been forced by the government under penalty of imprisonment to recruit children (under 18 years of age) at gunpoint to serve in the military, and to shoot those who refuse (1997-2001)

Publisher Canada: Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada
Author Research Directorate, Immigration and Refugee Board, Canada
Publication Date 16 October 2001
Citation / Document Symbol ETH37858.E
Reference 4
Cite as Canada: Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada, Ethiopia: Information on civilians, particularly in Addis Ababa, who have been forced by the government under penalty of imprisonment to recruit children (under 18 years of age) at gunpoint to serve in the military, and to shoot those who refuse (1997-2001) , 16 October 2001, ETH37858.E , available at: http://www.refworld.org/docid/3df4be310.html [accessed 20 November 2017]
DisclaimerThis is not a UNHCR publication. UNHCR is not responsible for, nor does it necessarily endorse, its content. Any views expressed are solely those of the author or publisher and do not necessarily reflect those of UNHCR, the United Nations or its Member States.

No information on whether civilians were forced by the Ethiopian government to recruit children to serve in the military could be found among the sources consulted by the Research Directorate. However, a briefing paper entitled "Ethiopian Child Soldiers" published by the Coalition to Stop the Use of Child Soldiers reported that the conscription of underage males "does not occur in Addis Ababa, where it could be noted by diplomats and political activists" (10 July 2000). According to the Advocacy Director of the Children's Rights Division of Human Rights Watch, which is a member of the Coalition, the information in the above-cited briefing paper was obtained from a human rights worker in Ethiopia. The Advocacy Director had not heard of civilians being used to recruit children to serve in the military, and while not sure about Ethiopia specifically, said that recruitment of children in various countries in Africa was generally carried out by armed groups or tribal chiefs.

The briefing paper also reported that according to information obtained from teenage prisoners of war at a camp in Eritrea, some boys were recruited by kebele (neighbourhood association) officials at their schools, while others were "seized" from the marketplace by soldiers (10 July 2000).

Detailed information on kebeles (or kebelles) can be found in previous Responses to Information Requests.

This Response was prepared after researching publicly accessible information currently available to the Research Directorate within time constraints. This Response is not, and does not purport to be, conclusive as to the merit of any particular claim to refugee status or asylum. Please find below the list of additional sources consulted in researching this Information Request.

References

Coalition to Stop the Use of Child Soldiers. 10 July 2000. "Ethiopian Child Soldiers." London: Coalition to Stop the Use of Child Soldiers.

Human Rights Watch (HRW), New York. 16 October 2001. Telephone interview with the Advocacy Director of the Children's Rights Division.

Additional Sources Consulted

IRB Databases

IRIN

NEXIS

US Department of State Country Reports on Human Rights Practices 1999-2000.

WNC

Internet sites including:

Amnesty International

ICRC

UNHCHR

UNHCR

Copyright notice: This document is published with the permission of the copyright holder and producer Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada (IRB). The original version of this document may be found on the offical website of the IRB at http://www.irb-cisr.gc.ca/en/. Documents earlier than 2003 may be found only on Refworld.

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