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Congo-Brazzaville: Forced recruitment of young men by Pascal Lissouba's (former president) forces in the southern part of the country and how this recruitment was being conducted (1997)

Publisher Canada: Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada
Author Research Directorate, Immigration and Refugee Board, Canada
Publication Date 25 August 2000
Citation / Document Symbol COG35046.E
Reference 2
Cite as Canada: Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada, Congo-Brazzaville: Forced recruitment of young men by Pascal Lissouba's (former president) forces in the southern part of the country and how this recruitment was being conducted (1997), 25 August 2000, COG35046.E, available at: http://www.refworld.org/docid/3ae6ad5534.html [accessed 17 December 2017]
DisclaimerThis is not a UNHCR publication. UNHCR is not responsible for, nor does it necessarily endorse, its content. Any views expressed are solely those of the author or publisher and do not necessarily reflect those of UNHCR, the United Nations or its Member States.

Information on the forced recruitment of young men by Lissouba's forces in the southern part of the country during 1997 could not be found among the sources consulted by the Research Directorate. However, referring to 1997 [under Lissouba régime] and 1998-1999 [under Sassou-Nguesso régime] civil wars, a report published by the International Coalition to Stop the Use of Child Soldiers revealed the following.

It is not known whether recruitment procedures for enlistment into the regular forces are followed. It is certain that recruitment of children into government- supported militia had been systematic (7 Jan. 2000).

According to Oxfam Emergency Bulletin, in Congo, "militia groups are drawn mainly from the home areas of the respective leaders, a trend which has resulted in sharp cleavages between regional groups based on ethnic or regional lines" (Dec. 1999).

For information on Pascal Lissouba's home areas and ethnic groups supporters, please refer to COG35030.F of 25 August 2000.

This Response was prepared after researching publicly accessible information currently available to the Research Directorate within time constraints. This Response is not, and does not purport to be, conclusive as to the merit of any particular claim to refugee status or asylum. Please find below the list of additional sources consulted in researching this Information Request.

Sources Consulted

The International Coalition to Stop the Use of Child Soldiers. 7 January 2000. The Use of Children as Soldiers in Africa: A Country Analsyis of Child Recruitment and Participation in Armed Conflict: Congo [Accessed 25 Aug.2000]

Oxfam Emergency Bulletin. December 1999. Country Profile: Republic of Congo-Congo Brazzaville. [Date de consultation : 25 Aug. 2000]

Additional Sources Consulted

Africa Confidential 1997.

Africa Research Bulletin 1997.

Amnesty Internationa Annual Report 1998.

Country Reports 1997. 1998.

IRB Databases.

Keesing's Record of World Events 1997.

Le Nouvel Afrique-Asie 1997.

La Nouvelle Lettre de la FIDH 1997.

Resources Centre country file. Congo. 1997.

West Africa 1997.

World News Connection (WNC).

Internet Sites, including:

Africa News Service.

Amnesty International Online.

BBC Africa Online

Human Rights Watch Online.

International Crisis Group (ICG).

Missionary Service News Agency (MISNA).

Observatoire de l'Afrique Centrale.

Panafrican News Agency (PANA).

United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights.

The Use of child Soldier.

War Resisters International.

Internet Search Engines, including:

Copyright notice: This document is published with the permission of the copyright holder and producer Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada (IRB). The original version of this document may be found on the offical website of the IRB at http://www.irb-cisr.gc.ca/en/. Documents earlier than 2003 may be found only on Refworld.

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