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Query Responses

Query responses are replies to focused queries or requests for Information that are submitted in the course of the refugee status determination process.
Selected filters: Customary law
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Showing 1-10 of 12 results
Cameroon: Legislation governing the estate of a man who dies intestate; who has the authority to settle his estate and how his inheritance is divided among his wives and children; whether circumstances exist in which the division of the estate is determined by Bamileke customary law rather than by civil law; possible court remedies in the event of litigation within the extended family (2014-May 2015)

8 May 2016 | Publisher: Canada: Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada | Document type: Query Responses

Cameroun : information sur les lois régissant la succession d'un homme qui meurt sans laisser de testament; information indiquant qui a le pouvoir de régler sa succession et comment son héritage est réparti entre ses femmes et ses enfants; information indiquant s'il existe des circonstances dans lesquelles la répartition de la succession est déterminée par le droit coutumier bamiléké plutôt que par le droit civil; information sur les recours judiciaires possibles en cas de litige au sein de la famille élargie (2014-mai 2015)

8 May 2015 | Publisher: Canada: Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada | Document type: Query Responses

Cameroon: (1) Regions where Traditional Heads maintain strong authority over the population. (2) Relationships between the Government and local Traditional Heads (whether an individual may be arbitrarily arrested and/ or detained by the authorities for personal motivations held by Traditional Heads, and whether there are any legal protective measures which are effective from which a person can benefit), such as: -What is the relationship between local Traditional Heads and the central/local Government and the judiciary? -What type of power or authority, local traditional heads have; i.e. can they be linked to local authorities; do they have (official or unofficial) authority to order police to arrest individuals and/or have prosecutors try individuals in court, and if so, would the federal authorities intervene (for example if the traditional head manipulates the authorities to arrest, falsely charge try individuals in trails which lack due process guarantees) -Can the local traditional heads exert their power beyond their own/ local areas, for example to the capital city? (3) In the event a power struggle among Traditional Heads, including a fight to take over the Traditional Headship, occurs in particular regions, whether the central/ regional Government would be able to exert control, including through administrative regulations, legislative activities and/or exercise of judicial/police authority. In other words, can the federal or local authorities protect an individual from threats by non-state agents who want to take over the role? Would the Traditional Head themselves be able to protect an individual appointed as the next Traditional Head from non-state agents wanting to take over the role?

15 July 2013 | Publisher: Country of Origin Research and Information (CORI) | Document type: Query Responses

Ghana: (1) Regions where Traditional Heads maintain strong authority over the population. (2) Relationships between the Government and local Traditional Heads (whether an individual may be arbitrarily arrested and/ or detained by the authorities for personal motivations held by Traditional Heads, and whether there are any legal protective measures which are effective from which a person can benefit), such as: -What is the relationship between local Traditional Heads and the central/local Government and the judiciary? -What type of power or authority, local traditional heads have; i.e. can they be linked to local authorities; do they have (official or unofficial) authority to order police to arrest individuals and/or have prosecutors try individuals in court, and if so, would the federal authorities intervene (for example if the traditional head manipulates the authorities to arrest, falsely charge try individuals in trails which lack due process guarantees) -Can the local traditional heads exert their power beyond their own/ local areas, for example to the capital city? (3) In the event a power struggle among Traditional Heads, including a fight to take over the Traditional Headship, occurs in particular regions, whether the central/ regional Government would be able to exert control, including through administrative regulations, legislative activities and/or exercise of judicial/police authority. In other words, can the federal or local authorities protect an individual from threats by non-state agents who want to take over the role? Would the Traditional Head themselves be able to protect an individual appointed as the next Traditional Head from non-state agents wanting to take over the role?

15 July 2013 | Publisher: Country of Origin Research and Information (CORI) | Document type: Query Responses

Ghana: (1) Regions where Traditional Heads maintain strong authority over the population. (2) Relationships between the Government and local Traditional Heads (whether an individual may be arbitrarily arrested and/ or detained by the authorities for personal motivations held by Traditional Heads, and whether there are any legal protective measures which are effective from which a person can benefit), such as: -What is the relationship between local Traditional Heads and the central/local Government and the judiciary? -What type of power or authority, local traditional heads have; i.e. can they be linked to local authorities; do they have (official or unofficial) authority to order police to arrest individuals and/or have prosecutors try individuals in court, and if so, would the federal authorities intervene (for example if the traditional head manipulates the authorities to arrest, falsely charge try individuals in trails which lack due process guarantees) -Can the local traditional heads exert their power beyond their own/ local areas, for example to the capital city? (3) In the event a power struggle among Traditional Heads, including a fight to take over the Traditional Headship, occurs in particular regions, whether the central/ regional Government would be able to exert control, including through administrative regulations, legislative activities and/or exercise of judicial/police authority. In other words, can the federal or local authorities protect an individual from threats by non-state agents who want to take over the role? Would the Traditional Head themselves be able to protect an individual appointed as the next Traditional Head from non-state agents wanting to take over the role?

15 July 2013 | Publisher: Country of Origin Research and Information (CORI) | Document type: Query Responses

Nigeria: (1) Regions where Traditional Heads maintain strong authority over the population. (2) Relationships between the Government and local Traditional Heads (whether an individual may be arbitrarily arrested and/ or detained by the authorities for personal motivations held by Traditional Heads, and whether there are any legal protective measures which are effective from which a person can benefit), such as: -What is the relationship between local Traditional Heads and the central/local Government and the judiciary? -What type of power or authority, local traditional heads have; i.e. can they be linked to local authorities; do they have (official or unofficial) authority to order police to arrest individuals and/or have prosecutors try individuals in court, and if so, would the federal authorities intervene (for example if the traditional head manipulates the authorities to arrest, falsely charge try individuals in trails which lack due process guarantees) -Can the local traditional heads exert their power beyond their own/ local areas, for example to the capital city? (3) In the event a power struggle among Traditional Heads, including a fight to take over the Traditional Headship, occurs in particular regions, whether the central/ regional Government would be able to exert control, including through administrative regulations, legislative activities and/or exercise of judicial/police authority. In other words, can the federal or local authorities protect an individual from threats by non-state agents who want to take over the role? Would the Traditional Head themselves be able to protect an individual appointed as the next Traditional Head from non-state agents wanting to take over the role?

15 July 2013 | Publisher: Country of Origin Research and Information (CORI) | Document type: Query Responses

Pakistan : information sur l'enregistrement des mariages, y compris les mariages mixtes

14 January 2013 | Publisher: Canada: Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada | Document type: Query Responses

Pakistan: Information on marriage registration, including mixed marriages

14 January 2013 | Publisher: Canada: Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada | Document type: Query Responses

Namibia: Customary and common law including matters of inheritance; how conflicts betwen the two systems of law are resolved

14 August 2012 | Publisher: Canada: Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada | Document type: Query Responses

Namibie : information sur le droit coutumier et la common law, y compris les questions d'héritage; la résolution des conflits entre les deux systèmes juridiques

14 August 2012 | Publisher: Canada: Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada | Document type: Query Responses

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