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Burundi: Information on whether there are any discernible differences between Hutus and Tutsis in Burundi in terms of lifestyle, appearance, and practices; and on whether it is possible to tell by a person's name whether they belong to the Hutu or Tutsi ethnic group

Publisher Canada: Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada
Author Research Directorate, Immigration and Refugee Board, Canada
Publication Date 1 April 1995
Citation / Document Symbol BDI20422.E
Cite as Canada: Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada, Burundi: Information on whether there are any discernible differences between Hutus and Tutsis in Burundi in terms of lifestyle, appearance, and practices; and on whether it is possible to tell by a person's name whether they belong to the Hutu or Tutsi ethnic group, 1 April 1995, BDI20422.E, available at: http://www.refworld.org/docid/3ae6acba80.html [accessed 1 October 2014]
DisclaimerThis is not a UNHCR publication. UNHCR is not responsible for, nor does it necessarily endorse, its content. Any views expressed are solely those of the author or publisher and do not necessarily reflect those of UNHCR, the United Nations or its Member States.

 

The Encyclopaedia of the Third World states the following:

The two differ markedly in physical appearance. The average Hutu is short and stocky, while the Tutsi are tall, slender, angular and relatively light-skinned (1992, 274).

The New Encyclopaedia Britannica states that "the Hutu and Tutsi adhere essentially to the same religious beliefs, which include forms of animism and Christianity" (1989, 72). Country Reports on Human Rights Practices 1994, claims that seven of Bujumbura's [Burundi's capital city], residential districts are segregated along ethnic lines (1995, 25). For additional information on these subjects, please refer to the attached documents.

Information on whether it is possible to tell a person's ethnic background from his or her name could not be found among the sources consulted by the DIRB.

This response was prepared after researching publicly accessible information currently available to the DIRB within time constraints. This response is not, and does not purport to be, conclusive as to the merit of any particular claim to refugee status or asylum. Please find attached the list of sources consulted in researching this information request.

References

Country Reports on Human Rights Practices for 1994. 1995. United States Department of State. Washington, DC: United States Government Printing Office.

Encyclopaedia of the Third World. 1992. 4th ed. Vol. 1. Edited by George Thomas Kurian. New York: Facts on File.

The New Encylopaedia Britannica. 1989. 15th ed. Vol. 12. Edited by Philip Goetz. Chicago: Encyclopaedia Britannica.

Attachments

Encyclopedia of the Third World. 1992. 4th ed. Vol. 1. Edited by George Thomas Kurian. New York: Facts on File, p. 274.

The New Encylopaedia Britannica. 1989. 15th ed. Vol. 6. Edited by Philip Goetz. Chicago: Encyclopaedia Britannica, p. 177.

_____. 1989. 15th ed. Vol. 12. Edited by Philip Goetz. Chicago: Encyclopedia Britannica, p. 72.

Sources Consulted

Afrique/Asie [Paris].

Africa Confidential [London]. Weekly.

Africa Events [London]. Monthly.

Africa News [Durham, NC]. Bi-monthly.

Africa Report [New York]. Bi-monthly.

Africa Research Bulletin: Political Series [London]. Monthly.

Human Rights in Africa. 1990. Washington: Brookings Institute.

Jeune Afrique [Paris]. Weekly.

New African [London]. Monthly.

News from Africa Watch [New York]. Monthly.

Oral sources.

Copyright notice: This document is published with the permission of the copyright holder and producer Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada (IRB). The original version of this document may be found on the offical website of the IRB at http://www.irb-cisr.gc.ca/en/. Documents earlier than 2003 may be found only on Refworld.

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