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Ghana: Information on where Konkomba tribe reside and on their tribal or mother language

Publisher Canada: Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada
Author Research Directorate, Immigration and Refugee Board, Canada
Publication Date 1 April 1996
Citation / Document Symbol GHA23453.E
Cite as Canada: Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada, Ghana: Information on where Konkomba tribe reside and on their tribal or mother language, 1 April 1996, GHA23453.E, available at: http://www.refworld.org/docid/3ae6ac251c.html [accessed 2 September 2014]
DisclaimerThis is not a UNHCR publication. UNHCR is not responsible for, nor does it necessarily endorse, its content. Any views expressed are solely those of the author or publisher and do not necessarily reflect those of UNHCR, the United Nations or its Member States.

 

The Konkomba is a subgroup of the Gurma, which in turn is a subgroup of the Gur, an ethnic group found in northern Ghana (Ghana: A Country Study 1971, 90, 92, 101). According to the same source, the Konkomba represent 1.6 per cent of the total population of Ghana. In 1992, the population of the Konkomba was estimated as being 220,000 in Ghana and 50,100 in Togo (Ethnonologue 1992, 268). The Konkomba live in the area around Guerin, Yendi district and in Togo (ibid.). The Konkomba language is divided into three dialects: Likpakpaln, Kpankpam and Kom Komba (ibid.).

Please consult the cited sources, which are attached to the Response, for additional information.

This Response was prepared after researching publicly accessible information currently available to the DIRB within time constraints. This Response is not, and does not purport to be, conclusive as to the merit of any particular claim to refugee status or asylum. Please find below the list of additional sources consulted in researching this Information Request

References

Ethnologue: Language of the Word. 1992. 12th Edition. Edited by Barbara F. Grimes. Dallas, Texas: Summer Linguistics

Ghana: A Country Study. 1971. Edited by Irving Kaplan et al. Washington, DC: Secretary of the Army.

Attachments

Ethnologue: Language of the Word. 1992. 12th Edition. Edited by Barbara F. Grimes. Dallas, Texas: Summer Linguistics, p. 268.

Ghana: A Country Study. 1971. Edited by Irving Kaplan et al. Washington, DC: Secretary of the Army, pp. 90, 92, 101.

Additional Sources Consulted

Africa Confidential [London]. 1990 to present.

Africa Research Bulletin: Political Series [London]. Monthly.

Ethnic Preference and Public Policy in Developing States. 1986. Boulder, Co.: Lynne Rienner.

Foreign Broadcast Information Service (FBIS) Reports.

Ghanaian Times [Accra]. 1990-1993.

Minority Peoples in the Age of Nation-States. 1989. London: Pluto Press.

Minority Rights Group International. Various dates. London: Minority Rights Group International.

The Minority Rights Group Reports. Various dates. London: La force des faibles.

West Africa [London]. Weekly.

World Directory of Minorities. 1990. London: Minority Rights Groups International.

World Minorities in the Eighties. 1980. London: Quartermaine House.

Copyright notice: This document is published with the permission of the copyright holder and producer Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada (IRB). The original version of this document may be found on the offical website of the IRB at http://www.irb-cisr.gc.ca/en/. Documents earlier than 2003 may be found only on Refworld.

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