Last Updated: Tuesday, 22 August 2017, 16:13 GMT

Iran: Information on the crime of rape

Publisher Canada: Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada
Author Research Directorate, Immigration and Refugee Board, Canada
Publication Date 1 September 1996
Citation / Document Symbol IRN24445.E
Cite as Canada: Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada, Iran: Information on the crime of rape, 1 September 1996, IRN24445.E, available at: http://www.refworld.org/docid/3ae6abc34c.html [accessed 23 August 2017]
DisclaimerThis is not a UNHCR publication. UNHCR is not responsible for, nor does it necessarily endorse, its content. Any views expressed are solely those of the author or publisher and do not necessarily reflect those of UNHCR, the United Nations or its Member States.

 

A 19 July 1996 Federal News Service report states that under the Iranian Penal Code, the crime of rape is punishable by execution. On 10 July 1996 the Xinhua News Agency reported that rape is punishable by death.

The following information was provided during a 10 September 1996 telephone interview with a specialist on Iran at George Mason University in Fairfax, Virginia.

The source stated that rape is not commonly reported in Iran because of the shame associated with it. The source added that rape is rare in Iran. However, the source was unable to provide an assessment of rapes inside marriages. A rape victim would not be at risk for reporting a rape, but she would be socially "tainted". The Iranian authorities would provide assistance to prosecute the offender in a rape case involving a man who was not known to the victim, and where the evidence is unequivocal. A rape case involving an offender known to the victim would not receive the same support from the authorities because they would want to know why the woman was alone with the man. In this situation the burden of proof would be on the woman. As well, if the offender is a member of the security forces apparatus or clergy, the case likely would never be prosecuted. The source stated that statistics on rapes in Iran are almost non-existent.

The above information was corroborated during a 11 September 1996 telephone interview with a specialist on Iran in England.

This Response was prepared after researching publicly accessible information currently available to the DIRB within time constraints. This Response is not, and does not purport to be, conclusive as to the merit of any particular claim to refugee status or asylum.

References

Federal News Service. 19 July 1996. "Iran Adopts Tough New Laws That Expand Use of Death Penalty." (NEXIS)

Professor specializing on Iran, George Mason University, Fairfax, Virginia. 10 September 1996. Telephone interview.

Specialist on Iran, England. 11 September 1996. Telephone interview.

The Xinhua News Agency. 10 July 1996. "Iran to Hang Three Armed Robbers in Tehran." (NEXIS)

Attachments

Federal News Service. 19 July 1996. "Iran Adopts Tough New Laws That Expand Use of Death Penalty." (NEXIS)

The Xinhua News Agency. 10 July 1996. "Iran to Hang Three Armed Robbers in Tehran." (NEXIS)

Copyright notice: This document is published with the permission of the copyright holder and producer Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada (IRB). The original version of this document may be found on the offical website of the IRB at http://www.irb-cisr.gc.ca/en/. Documents earlier than 2003 may be found only on Refworld.

Search Refworld