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Somaliland: The Akisho[Akesho]: whether they live in the town of Gebileh, their relationship with Isaaks and whether they have political representation in the current government

Publisher Canada: Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada
Author Research Directorate, Immigration and Refugee Board, Canada
Publication Date 1 June 1998
Citation / Document Symbol SML29563.E
Cite as Canada: Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada, Somaliland: The Akisho[Akesho]: whether they live in the town of Gebileh, their relationship with Isaaks and whether they have political representation in the current government, 1 June 1998, SML29563.E, available at: http://www.refworld.org/docid/3ae6ab6760.html [accessed 28 July 2014]
DisclaimerThis is not a UNHCR publication. UNHCR is not responsible for, nor does it necessarily endorse, its content. Any views expressed are solely those of the author or publisher and do not necessarily reflect those of UNHCR, the United Nations or its Member States.

 

The information in contained in this Response was provided by Matt Bryden, a consultant and Somali specialist now working with the United Nations Institute for Research on Social Development (UNRISD) in Nairobi (16 June 1998). He stated that the Akisho "are related to (if not part of) the Dir clan family, and live mainly between Jigjiga [in Ethiopia] and Hargeysa, where they tend to live in a somewhat subordinate status to the majority clans, although in Somaliland they have been awarded a seat in the constituent assembly. They face no general threat of persecution in any of the areas in which they live." The Research Directorate was unable to corroborate the Akisho's participation in the constituent assembly nor whether they face "persecution."

According to the Ethiopian Review the Akisho may be more numerous in Ethiopia than they are in Somalia (30 Apr. 1996). For additional information on the Dir clan and the Akisho sub clan, please consult Patrick Gilkes' The Price of Peace: Somalia and the United Nations 1991-1994 pages 144-148, and the appendix of Somali clan families.

This Response was prepared after researching publicly accessible information currently available to the Research Directorate within time constraints. This Response is not, and does not purport to be, conclusive as to the merit of any particular claim to refugee status or asylum.

Reference

Bryden, Matt. UNRISD, Nairobi. 16 June 1998. Letter received by electronic mail.

Gilkes, Patrick. September 1994. The Price of Peace: Somalia and the United Nations 1991-1994. Bedfordshire, UK: Save the Children Fund, UK.

Additional Sources Consulted

Africa Confidential [London]. January - May 1998. Vol. 39. Nos. 1-11.

_____.  January - December 1997. Vol. 38. Nos. 1-25.

Africa Research Bulletin: Political, Social and Cultural Series [Oxford]. January - May 1998. Vol. 35. Nos. 1-4.

_____. January - December 1997. Vol. 34. Nos. 1-11.

Country Reports on Human Rights Practices for 1997. 1998.

Horn of Africa Bulletin [Uppsala]. Vol. 10. Nos. 1-2.

_____. Jauary - December 1997. Vol. 9. Nos. 1-10.

The Indian Ocean Newsletter [Paris]. January - June 1998. Nos. 793-815.

_____. January - December 1997. Nos. 747 - 792.

Electronic sources: IRB Databases, LEXIS/NEXIS, Internet, World News Connection (WNC).

Two oral sources consulted could not provide information on the requested subject.

Copyright notice: This document is published with the permission of the copyright holder and producer Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada (IRB). The original version of this document may be found on the offical website of the IRB at http://www.irb-cisr.gc.ca/en/. Documents earlier than 2003 may be found only on Refworld.

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