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Yugoslavia: Information on the treatment of ethnic Montenegrins, especially in the Vojvodina area

Publisher Canada: Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada
Author Research Directorate, Immigration and Refugee Board, Canada
Publication Date 1 April 1994
Citation / Document Symbol YUG17137.E
Cite as Canada: Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada, Yugoslavia: Information on the treatment of ethnic Montenegrins, especially in the Vojvodina area, 1 April 1994, YUG17137.E, available at: http://www.refworld.org/docid/3ae6ac890.html [accessed 14 December 2017]
DisclaimerThis is not a UNHCR publication. UNHCR is not responsible for, nor does it necessarily endorse, its content. Any views expressed are solely those of the author or publisher and do not necessarily reflect those of UNHCR, the United Nations or its Member States.

 

According to C.I.S. and Eastern Europe on File, Montenegrins make up for six per cent of the total population in the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia (FRY) (1993, 2.65). World Directory of Minorities indicates that the majority of Montenegrins live in Montenegro where they constitute 68 per cent of the population; the remainder of the population is mainly composed of Muslims (13.4 per cent) and Albanians (6.5 per cent) (1990, 135).

People in Power indicates that, within the new federal government formed in July 1992, the Federal Assembly is composed of representatives from the Republics of Serbia and Montenegro (Feb. 1994). According to the same source, the Federal Assembly is divided into a 138-seat Chamber of Citizens (108 members from Serbia and 30 from Montenegro) and a 40-seat Chamber of Republics in which the seats are equally divided between Serbia and Montenegro (ibid.).

Representatives of Human Rights Watch in New York, Radio Free Europe in Munich and the Canadian embassy in Belgrade were unaware of any reports of mistreatment of or discrimination against Montenegrins in the FRY (Human Rights Watch 25 Apr. 1994; RFE/RL 25 Apr. 1994; Embassy of Canada 21 Apr. 1994).

This response was prepared after researching publicly accessible information currently available to the DIRB within time constraints. This response is not, and does not purport to be, conclusive as to the merit of any particular claim to refugee status or asylum.

References

C.I.S. and Eastern Europe on File. 1993. New York: Facts on File.

Embassy of Canada, Belgrade. 21 April 1994. Telephone interview with representative.

Human Rights Watch, New York. 25 April 1994. Telephone interview with representative.

Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty (RFE/RL), Munich. 25 April 1994. Telephone interview with representative.

People in Power. 1993. Release No. 29. London: Keesing's Publications, Longman Group UK Ltd.

World Directory of Minorities. 1990. Chicago: Minority Rights Group.

Attachments

C.I.S. and Eastern Europe on File. 1993. New York: Facts on File, p. 2.65.

People in Power. 1993. Release No. 29. London: Keesing's Publications, Longman Group UK Ltd.

World Directory of Minorities. 1990. Chicago: Minority Rights Group, pp. 132-33, 135.

Copyright notice: This document is published with the permission of the copyright holder and producer Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada (IRB). The original version of this document may be found on the offical website of the IRB at http://www.irb-cisr.gc.ca/en/. Documents earlier than 2003 may be found only on Refworld.

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