Last Updated: Tuesday, 23 May 2017, 14:34 GMT

Uganda: Whether residents need permission from local council or any other authority to move from locality to locality in Uganda; if so, whether this rule also applies to a person who is moving back with his or her parents (April 2005)

Publisher Canada: Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada
Author Research Directorate, Immigration and Refugee Board, Canada
Publication Date 21 April 2005
Citation / Document Symbol UGA43506.E (corrected March 2008)
Reference 2
Cite as Canada: Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada, Uganda: Whether residents need permission from local council or any other authority to move from locality to locality in Uganda; if so, whether this rule also applies to a person who is moving back with his or her parents (April 2005), 21 April 2005, UGA43506.E (corrected March 2008), available at: http://www.refworld.org/docid/42df61b411.html [accessed 23 May 2017]
Comments Corrected March 2008
DisclaimerThis is not a UNHCR publication. UNHCR is not responsible for, nor does it necessarily endorse, its content. Any views expressed are solely those of the author or publisher and do not necessarily reflect those of UNHCR, the United Nations or its Member States.

In a 19 April 2005 correspondence, the First Secretary of the Uganda High Commission in Ottawa wrote the following:

Ugandan nationals residing within the country can move freely within Uganda on short visits. However, [ ... ] those individuals who wish to settle in a different locality must obtain a letter from the local council chief of the area indicating that they are good citizens without any criminal record.

[ ... ]Persons returning from abroad are free to settle anywhere in the country without any special introductions or clearance.

In addition, Paragraph 29 (2) of the Constitution of the Republic of Uganda 1995 states as follow:

Every Ugandan shall have the right:

(a) to move freely throughout Uganda and to reside and settle in any part of Uganda;

(b) to enter, leave and return to, Uganda; and

(c) to a passport or other travel document.

However, referring to Uganda, Country Reports 2004 stated that, while the constitution provides for freedom of movement within the country, "some local officials reportedly demanded payment of fees before writing a letter of introduction on behalf of individuals changing their residence" (28 Feb. 2005).

This Response was prepared after researching publicly accessible information currently available to the Research Directorate within time constraints. This Response is not, and does not purport to be, conclusive as to the merit of any particular claim for refugee protection. Please find below the list of additional sources consulted in researching this Information Request.

References

Country Reports on Human Rights Practices for 2004. 28 February 2005. US Department of State. Washington D.C.

Uganda. 1995. « The Constitution of the Republic of Uganda ». [Accessed 20 Apr. 2005]

Uganda High Commission, Ottawa. 19 April 2005. Written communication from the First Secretary.

Additional Sources Consulted

The Uganda High Commission in Ottawa did not respond within times constraints.

Publications, including: Africa Confidential, Resource Centre country file.

Websites, including: AllAfrica, BBC Africa, Ugandan government Website, The Monitor, New Vision.

Copyright notice: This document is published with the permission of the copyright holder and producer Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada (IRB). The original version of this document may be found on the offical website of the IRB at http://www.irb-cisr.gc.ca/en/. Documents earlier than 2003 may be found only on Refworld.

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