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Uganda: The National Youth Council (NYC) including its profile, purpose, history, composition, size and number of staff; volunteers; methods used to recruit youth for military service; media coverage between 1996 and 1998 relating to military mobilization for the Congo and northern Uganda

Publisher Canada: Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada
Author Research Directorate, Immigration and Refugee Board, Canada
Publication Date 15 May 2001
Citation / Document Symbol UGA36911.E
Reference 2
Cite as Canada: Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada, Uganda: The National Youth Council (NYC) including its profile, purpose, history, composition, size and number of staff; volunteers; methods used to recruit youth for military service; media coverage between 1996 and 1998 relating to military mobilization for the Congo and northern Uganda , 15 May 2001, UGA36911.E , available at: http://www.refworld.org/docid/3df4bebb0.html [accessed 27 August 2016]
DisclaimerThis is not a UNHCR publication. UNHCR is not responsible for, nor does it necessarily endorse, its content. Any views expressed are solely those of the author or publisher and do not necessarily reflect those of UNHCR, the United Nations or its Member States.

The Uganda National Youth Council (UNYC) is listed among national youth and student organizations in Uganda (Vision Office 1997). Additional information on the UNYC could not be found among the sources consulted by the Research Directorate.

The use of child soldiers to fight in the war in the Democratic Republic of the Congo and in northern Uganda has been noted by several sources (Amnesty International 31 May 2000; The Defence Monitor July 1997; The Independent Oct. 1999; PANA 20 Apr. 1999; Human Rights Watch 1997; World Vision Uganda/UNICEF 1999).

In addition to information contained in UGA36245.E of 12 February 2001 and UGA35007.E of 8 August 2000, Amnesty International states that,

in Uganda, parents in the western district of Hoima told The Monitor newspaper in November 1998 that children as young as 12 years had been secretly recruited by officials of the Internal Security Organization (ISO) to join the army. People in the district suspected that the children were being recruited to fight in the DRC or to replace soldiers already deployed there. Local councillors reportedly complained that many of those recruited were below 18 years and of questionable disciplinary record. One parent claimed that two of his children who had been recruited were primary school pupils aged 12 and 13 years. A district ISO official reportedly said children had been recruited from central Ugandan districts of Kiboga, Mubende and Mpigi ( 31 May 2000).

PANA quoting a study conducted by the USA-based non-governmental organization (NGO), the Coalition to Stop the use of Child Soldiers, states that "children are forced to join the army to be sent to the Democratic Republic of Congo where Ugandan soldiers have joined rebels to fight against the government" (20 Apr. 1999).

The Independent reports that "children aged between 13 and 16 make up 90 percent of the Lord's Resistance Army, which is fighting the government of President Yoweri Museveni in the north of the country" (19 Oct. 1999).

Detailed information on the recruitment of children to fight in the war in northern Uganda is contained in the Human Rights Watch Report, Scars of Death: Chilren Abducted by the Lord's Resistance Army in Uganda available at Regional Documentation Centres. Additional information is contained in the attached World Vision Uganda/UNICEF report.

References

Amnesty International. 31May 2000. Democratic Republic of the Congo: Killing Human Decency [Accessed: 14 May 2001]

The Defense Monitor, Centre for Defense Information. July 1997. "The Invisible Soldiers: Child Combatants." [Accessed: 14 May 2001]

The Independent [London]. 19 October 1999.Anne Penketh. "300,000 Child Soldiers Fighting on World's Front Lines." [Accessed: 14 May 2001]

Human Rights Watch. 1997. The Scars of Death: Children Abducted by the Lord's Ressitance Army in Uganda. New York: Human Rights Watch.

Panafrican News Agency (PANA). 20 Apr. 1999. Jerome Hule. "Study Finds 120,000 Child Soldiers in Africa."

[Accessed: 14 May 2001]

Vision Office. 1997. "Country Data - National Youth and Student Orgs.: Uganda." [Accessed: 5 May 2001]

World Vision Uganda/UNICEF. 1999. Shattered Innocence.

Attachment

World Vision Uganda/UNICEF. 1999. Shattered Innocence, 1-29.

Copyright notice: This document is published with the permission of the copyright holder and producer Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada (IRB). The original version of this document may be found on the offical website of the IRB at http://www.irb-cisr.gc.ca/en/. Documents earlier than 2003 may be found only on Refworld.

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