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Romania: Treatment of Hungarians in Tasnad, Satu Mare by Mustea (a gang involving the police), including during the Hungarian cultural event in Tasnad in September 1997

Publisher Canada: Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada
Author Research Directorate, Immigration and Refugee Board, Canada
Publication Date 5 September 2002
Citation / Document Symbol ROM39873.E
Reference 5
Cite as Canada: Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada, Romania: Treatment of Hungarians in Tasnad, Satu Mare by Mustea (a gang involving the police), including during the Hungarian cultural event in Tasnad in September 1997, 5 September 2002, ROM39873.E, available at: http://www.refworld.org/docid/3f7d4e0b23.html [accessed 22 October 2017]
DisclaimerThis is not a UNHCR publication. UNHCR is not responsible for, nor does it necessarily endorse, its content. Any views expressed are solely those of the author or publisher and do not necessarily reflect those of UNHCR, the United Nations or its Member States.

Information on the treatment of Hungarians specifically in Tasnad, Satu Mare could not be found among the sources consulted by the Research Directorate.

Reports on the existence in Tasnad of a gang called "Mustea" that is led by a police officer, or that involves the police, and which targets ethnic Hungarians, also could not be found among the sources consulted by the Research Directorate.

Information on whether a Hungarian cultural event took place in Tasnad in September 1997 which was broken up by a gang, and where many people were injured, also could not be found among the sources consulted by the Research Directorate. However, in respect of relations between ethnic Hungarians and Romanians in Romania, the following information was found in the Country Reports on Human Rights Practices for 1997:

Ethnic Hungarians, numbering more than 1.6 million, constitute the largest and most vocal minority, and the UDMR [Hungarian Democratic Union of Romania] holds 36 seats in the Parliament. There was no violence in 1997 associated with ethnic Hungarian issues, despite the vitriolic response of nationalist politicians to the opening of a Hungarian consulate in the Transylvanian city of Cluj in July (30 Jan. 1998).

This Response was prepared after researching publicly accessible information currently available to the Research Directorate within time constraints. This Response is not, and does not purport to be, conclusive as to the merit of any particular claim to refugee status or asylum. Please find below the list of additional sources consulted in researching this Information Request.

Reference

Country Reports on Human Rights Practices for 1997. 30 January 1998. United States Department of State. Washington, DC. [Accessed 4 Sept. 2002]

Additional Sources Consulted

Amnesty International.

BBC.

BBC World Service. Global Crime Report.

Human Rights Watch.

International Helsinki Federation for Human Rights.

IRB databases.

LEXIS/NEXIS.

United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights.

WNC.

World News.

Search engines:

Google.

Hotbot.

Copyright notice: This document is published with the permission of the copyright holder and producer Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada (IRB). The original version of this document may be found on the offical website of the IRB at http://www.irb-cisr.gc.ca/en/. Documents earlier than 2003 may be found only on Refworld.

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