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Lebanon: Lebanese nationality; whether an identification card that has not been renewed since 1968 is still valid (2012-June 2013)

Publisher Canada: Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada
Publication Date 3 July 2013
Citation / Document Symbol LBN104470.E
Related Document Liban : information sur la nationalité libanaise; information indiquant si une carte d'identité qui n'a pas été renouvelée depuis 1968 demeure valide (2012-juin 2013)
Cite as Canada: Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada, Lebanon: Lebanese nationality; whether an identification card that has not been renewed since 1968 is still valid (2012-June 2013), 3 July 2013, LBN104470.E, available at: http://www.refworld.org/docid/52a731aa4.html [accessed 29 July 2016]
DisclaimerThis is not a UNHCR publication. UNHCR is not responsible for, nor does it necessarily endorse, its content. Any views expressed are solely those of the author or publisher and do not necessarily reflect those of UNHCR, the United Nations or its Member States.

In a telephone interview with the Research Directorate on 20 June 2013, a representative at the Embassy of Lebanon in Ottawa said that someone whose biological father is Lebanese is automatically granted Lebanese nationality. She explained that, even if a Lebanese person lived in Syria for many years, they can still be a Lebanese national (Lebanon 20 June 2013).

The Decree on Lebanese Nationality is attached to this Response.

In a telephone interview with the Research Directorate on 3 July 2013, this same representative explained that someone who is outside the country must contact the Embassy of Lebanon to prove their nationality (Lebanon 3 July 2013). The representative added that the person must send a letter to the Embassy of Lebanon with their name, date of birth and contact information, and the letter must request that a new extract of individual registration be issued (ibid.). The letter must also include a copy of the person's identification card (ibid.). The representative explained that the application is then sent to the Ministry of Foreign Affairs in Lebanon (ibid.). After the application is processed, a new extract of individual registration is sent to the embassy, which is responsible for forwarding it to the applicant (ibid.). The representative stated that this process is free and the applicant should allow at least two months for the document to be processed (ibid.).

The representative also explained that the information contained on the extract of individual registration is only in Arabic (ibid.). If the recipient chooses to have the document translated, a request can be made to the embassy; the cost for this service is approximately 15 CAD (ibid.). The recipient can also have the document translated by a certified translator (ibid.).

She also added that the extract of individual registration is one of the documents required when applying for a passport (ibid.). The website of the Embassy of Lebanon in Ottawa provides a list of the identification documents required when applying for a passport:

Recent extract of individual registration (Ikhraj Kayd Fardy date of issuance does not exceed 5 years) or Lebanese ID (new one computerized) or a photocopy of passport of the person issued in Lebanon after the year 1990: Only notarized copies of these documents are acceptable (Lebanon n.d.a.).

The representative stated that there is no expiry date for the identification card (Lebanon 20 June 2013). She explained, however, that the identification card would only be replaced by the new automated card if the cardholder returns to the country (ibid. 3 July 2013). Likewise, it is pointed out on the website of the Embassy of Lebanon in Abu Dhabi, in the United Arab Emirates, that "[a]s of June 30th 2006, all Lebanese nationals must hold the new magnetic Identification Card (ID)" (Lebanon n.d.b). The Embassy also notes that it encourages "all members of the Lebanese community abroad to apply, upon their arrival to Lebanon, for the new ID" (ibid.).

This Response was prepared after researching publicly accessible information currently available to the Research Directorate within time constraints. This Response is not, and does not purport to be, conclusive as to the merit of any particular claim for refugee protection. Please find below the list of sources consulted in researching this Information Request.

References

Lebanon. 3 July 2013. Embassy of Lebanon in Ottawa. Telephone interview with a representative.

_____. 20 June 2013. Embassy of Lebanon in Ottawa. Telephone interview with a representative.

_____. N.d.a. Embassy of Lebanon in Ottawa. "Passeport." [Accessed 27 June 2013]

_____. N.d.b. Embassy of Lebanon in Abu Dhabi. "Lebanese Passport." [Accessed 27 June 2013]

Additional Sources Consulted

Internet sites, including: Amnesty International; As-Safir Newspaper; Canada - Department of Foreign Affairs, Trade and Development; ecoi.net; Factiva; Freedom House; International Crisis Group; Lebanon - Consulate of Lebanon in Montréal, Embassy of Lebanon in Ottawa, Embassy of Lebanon in Paris, Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Emigration of the Republic of Lebanon; Lebanon Press; Legislationline; United Nations - Integrated Regional Information Networks, Refworld; United States - Department of State.

Attachment

Lebanon. 1925 (amended in 1960). Decree No. 15 on Lebanese Nationality. [Accessed 20 June 2013]

Copyright notice: This document is published with the permission of the copyright holder and producer Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada (IRB). The original version of this document may be found on the offical website of the IRB at http://www.irb-cisr.gc.ca/en/. Documents earlier than 2003 may be found only on Refworld.

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