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Iran: Information on domestic violence, protection available to women and avenues of redress, and the right of women to obtain a divorce on grounds of spousal abuse

Publisher Canada: Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada
Author Research Directorate, Immigration and Refugee Board, Canada
Publication Date 1 January 1994
Citation / Document Symbol IRN16039.E
Cite as Canada: Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada, Iran: Information on domestic violence, protection available to women and avenues of redress, and the right of women to obtain a divorce on grounds of spousal abuse, 1 January 1994, IRN16039.E, available at: http://www.refworld.org/docid/3ae6aaca18.html [accessed 17 December 2017]
DisclaimerThis is not a UNHCR publication. UNHCR is not responsible for, nor does it necessarily endorse, its content. Any views expressed are solely those of the author or publisher and do not necessarily reflect those of UNHCR, the United Nations or its Member States.

 

For information on divorce in Iran, please refer to Response to Information Request IRN16260.E of 27 January 1994.

Regarding domestic violence, Country Reports 1992 states that no official studies have been conducted on domestic violence and that not much is known about its extent, adding that "abuse within the family is considered a private matter ... and is seldom discussed publicly" (1993, 1004).

According to an associate professor of counselling psychology at Cambridge College, Boston, women are extremely reluctant to bring the problem into the open, and a majority of women may be undergoing some form of physical or psychological abuse (4 Nov. 1993).

According to the executive director of the Sisterhood Is Global Institute in Maryland and an associate professor of women's studies in New York, women in Iran have few options when faced with spousal abuse, since there are no shelters for battered women, and abuse is seen as the husband's prerogative (3 Nov. 1993). The executive director stated that although a woman may be able to return to her family home, social norms do not encourage this (3 Nov. 1993).

This response was prepared after researching publicly accessible information currently available to the DIRB within time constraints. This response is not, and does not purport to be, conclusive as to the merit of any particular claim to refugee status or asylum.

References

Executive director, Sisterhood Is Global Institute, Bethesda, Md. 3 November 1993. Telephone interview.

Country Reports on Human Rights Practices for 1992. 1993. United States Department of State. Washington, DC: United States Government Printing Office.

Associate professor of women's studies, Barnard College, New York. 3 November 1993. Telephone interview.

Associate professor of counselling psychology, Cambridge College, Boston. 4 November 1993. Telephone interview.

Copyright notice: This document is published with the permission of the copyright holder and producer Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada (IRB). The original version of this document may be found on the offical website of the IRB at http://www.irb-cisr.gc.ca/en/. Documents earlier than 2003 may be found only on Refworld.

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