Title Sierra Leone: 1. What is the situation for Fulas in Sierra Leone? Are they discriminated against and/or treated as foreigners because they are regarded as Guineans rather than as Sierra Leonese? Do they face discrimination in employment, education etc and/or possible persecution from the APC government because they are not traditional supporters of the APC? Are Fulas likely to be regarded as anti-government on account of their ethnicity? 2. What is the situation for high profile human rights activists? Is it common for high profile activists to be interviewed, assaulted and or detained by the authorities? Is such a person likely to be targeted and/or harmed by APC supporters for speaking out about government policies? 3. What is the relationship between the AFRC and the APC? Following the 1997 elections, were people who opposed the AFRC arrested and detained? Do opponents of the AFRC continue to face possible harm? 4. Were there outbreaks of violence between members of political parties (SLPP and APC) during the 2007 elections? Were some people prevented from voting? 5. Would a person who is an advocate against drugs, face possible harm from drug dealers (non-State actors)? 6. What is the level of state protection provided? Does the possibility of being regarded as anti-government affect the level of protection a person may receive? 7. What are the possibilities for relocation for a person who is a Fula and/or has established a high profile in Freetown as a human rights or youth advocate?
Publisher Australia: Refugee Review Tribunal
Publication Date 7 September 2010
Country Sierra Leone
Topics Discrimination based on race, nationality, ethnicity | Elections | Fulani | Human rights activists | Human rights and fundamental freedoms | Political groups | Political parties | Political situation | Right to employment | Security forces | Security situation | State protection
Citation / Document Symbol SLE37320
Cite as Australia: Refugee Review Tribunal, Sierra Leone: 1. What is the situation for Fulas in Sierra Leone? Are they discriminated against and/or treated as foreigners because they are regarded as Guineans rather than as Sierra Leonese? Do they face discrimination in employment, education etc and/or possible persecution from the APC government because they are not traditional supporters of the APC? Are Fulas likely to be regarded as anti-government on account of their ethnicity? 2. What is the situation for high profile human rights activists? Is it common for high profile activists to be interviewed, assaulted and or detained by the authorities? Is such a person likely to be targeted and/or harmed by APC supporters for speaking out about government policies? 3. What is the relationship between the AFRC and the APC? Following the 1997 elections, were people who opposed the AFRC arrested and detained? Do opponents of the AFRC continue to face possible harm? 4. Were there outbreaks of violence between members of political parties (SLPP and APC) during the 2007 elections? Were some people prevented from voting? 5. Would a person who is an advocate against drugs, face possible harm from drug dealers (non-State actors)? 6. What is the level of state protection provided? Does the possibility of being regarded as anti-government affect the level of protection a person may receive? 7. What are the possibilities for relocation for a person who is a Fula and/or has established a high profile in Freetown as a human rights or youth advocate?, 7 September 2010, SLE37320, available at: http://www.refworld.org/docid/4dd0f06f9.html [accessed 21 September 2014]
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