Last Updated: Friday, 11 July 2014, 13:14 GMT

Papua New Guinea: Information on the rights of an individual born in Papua New Guinea (PNG), and on the rights and obligations of the parents of a child born in PNG

Publisher Canada: Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada
Author Research Directorate, Immigration and Refugee Board, Canada
Publication Date 1 October 1994
Citation / Document Symbol PNG18700.E
Cite as Canada: Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada, Papua New Guinea: Information on the rights of an individual born in Papua New Guinea (PNG), and on the rights and obligations of the parents of a child born in PNG, 1 October 1994, PNG18700.E, available at: http://www.refworld.org/docid/3ae6ac106c.html [accessed 12 July 2014]
DisclaimerThis is not a UNHCR publication. UNHCR is not responsible for, nor does it necessarily endorse, its content. Any views expressed are solely those of the author or publisher and do not necessarily reflect those of UNHCR, the United Nations or its Member States.

 

The following information was provided by the first secretary of the Embassy of Papua New Guinea (PNG) in Washington, DC in a telephone interview on 19 October 1994.

A child born in PNG is not granted citizenship unless either the parents or the grandparents are PNG citizens. The first secretary was unsure whether both parents or both grandparents had to be PNG citizens in order for the child to be granted citizenship. A child born in PNG to foreign parents is not granted citizenship if the grandparents are also foreign.

An individual can apply for PNG citizenship if he fulfills a number of conditions, including residency in PNG for at least seven years, and can demonstrate the ability to speak one of the national languages. However, citizenship is not automatically granted.

Please consult the attached copy of article 66 (citizenship by descent) of the PNG constitution for additional information.

This response was prepared after researching publicly accessible information currently available to the DIRB within time constraints. This response is not, and does not purport to be, conclusive as to the merit of any particular claim to refugee status or asylum.

Reference

Embassy of Papua New Guinea, Washington, DC. 19 October 1994. Telephone interview with the first secretary.

Attachment

Toleris, Angela et al. September 1985. "Papua New Guinea," Constitutions of the Countries of the World. Edited by Albert P. Blaustein and Gisbert H. Flanz. Dobbs Ferry, NY: Oceana Publications, p. 72.

Copyright notice: This document is published with the permission of the copyright holder and producer Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada (IRB). The original version of this document may be found on the offical website of the IRB at http://www.irb-cisr.gc.ca/en/. Documents earlier than 2003 may be found only on Refworld.

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