Last Updated: Monday, 28 July 2014, 13:02 GMT

Peru: Procedures that citizens must follow to file a complaint about or report a crime to the police; requirements and procedures to obtain a police report from within Peru and from abroad

Publisher Canada: Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada
Publication Date 22 March 2011
Citation / Document Symbol PER103681.E
Cite as Canada: Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada, Peru: Procedures that citizens must follow to file a complaint about or report a crime to the police; requirements and procedures to obtain a police report from within Peru and from abroad, 22 March 2011, PER103681.E , available at: http://www.refworld.org/docid/4d9d90c02.html [accessed 28 July 2014]
DisclaimerThis is not a UNHCR publication. UNHCR is not responsible for, nor does it necessarily endorse, its content. Any views expressed are solely those of the author or publisher and do not necessarily reflect those of UNHCR, the United Nations or its Member States.

Reporting a crime to police

A Canadian Border Services Agency (CBSA) migration integrity assistant at the Embassy of Canada in Lima, Peru, indicated, in correspondence with the Research Directorate, that Peruvian citizens are to lodge criminal complaints with police at the station in the district where the crime took place (Canada 8 Feb. 2011). Somewhat similarly, the National Police of Peru (Policía Nacional del Perú, PNP) indicates on its website that a person can report a crime to the patrolling officer on duty in the jurisdiction in which the crime took place (Peru n.d.b). The complainant can also call police to have an officer visit his or her residence and later make a follow-up visit to the local police station (ibid.). The PNP website also indicates that a person can report a crime to the proper authority by phone, fax or email (ibid.).

Other ways of reporting a crime

The Public Ministry of Peru (Ministerio Público) --- the government body responsible for defending the public's legally protected interests and preventing and prosecuting crime (Peru n.d.a) --- indicates on its website that a person residing in Lima can file a criminal complaint at the Public Ministry's office (Peru n.d.a). The complaint will then be referred to a provincial criminal prosecutor (ibid.). The website also notes that a citizen can file a complaint with the Attorney General's (Fiscal General) office without having to go to a police station (ibid.). Moreover, when a person files a complaint, no payment is required and a lawyer is not necessary (ibid.). Information on how to obtain a police report from the Public Ministry of Peru could not be found within the constraints of this Response.

Procedure for obtaining police reports from Peru

The Migration Integrity Assistant said a citizen who wants a copy of the police report must pay approximately 3.60 Peru Nuevos Soles (PEN) [1 Peruvian Nuevos Soles = .35 Canadian dollars (XE.com 1 Mar. 2011)] -- at "any agency of the Banco de la Nación" (Canada 8 Feb. 2011). The Migration Integrity Assistant also indicated that the person must bring proof of payment (especie valorada), Peruvian identification and submit the requirements to a police station in the district where the event happened (ibid.).

Procedure for obtaining police reports from abroad

The Migration Integrity Assistant indicated that, in order for a citizen to obtain a copy of a police report from abroad, he or she must also pay the 3.60 PEN at a Banco Naciónal agency and provide proof of payment (Canada 8 Feb. 2011). In a follow-up telephone interview with the Research Directorate, the Assistant added that a citizen can authorize a lawyer or family member to act on his or her behalf by giving them power of attorney (ibid. 17 Feb. 2011).

This Response was prepared after researching publicly accessible information currently available to the Research Directorate within time constraints. This Response is not, and does not purport to be, conclusive as to the merit of any particular claim for refugee protection. Please find below the list of sources consulted in researching this Information Request.

References

Canada. 8 February 2011. Embassy of Canada, Lima, Peru. Correspondence with the Migration Integrity Assistant.

_____. 17 February. Embassy of Canada, Lima, Peru. Follow-up telephone interview with the Migration Integrity Assistant.

Peru. N.d. Ministerio Público. "Información General: Ministerio Público." [Accessed 1 Mar. 2011]

_____. N.d.a. Ministerio Público. "¿Dónde Denunciar?" [Accessed 28 Jan. 2011]

_____. N.d.b. Policía Nacional del Perú (PNP). "Recomendaciones Generales para el Público." [Accessed 11 Feb. 2011]

XE.com 1 March 2011. "Universal Currency Converter Results." [Accessed 1 Mar. 2011]

Additional Sources Consulted

Oral sources: An official at the Embassy of Peru in Ottawa was unable to provide information for this Response. Attempts to contact officials at the Policía Nacional del Perú (PNP) in Lima were unsuccessful.

Internet sites, including: Articuloz; Caretas [Lima]; Copseek.com; El Comercio; Factiva; Inter-American Commission on Human Rights (IACHR); International Relations and Security Network (ISN); Latin American Network Information Center (LANIC); Peru - Defensoría del Pueblo; Prensa [Lima], La Republica [Lima]; United Nations (UN) Integrated Regional Information Networks (IRIN); UN Refworld.

Copyright notice: This document is published with the permission of the copyright holder and producer Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada (IRB). The original version of this document may be found on the offical website of the IRB at http://www.irb-cisr.gc.ca/en/. Documents earlier than 2003 may be found only on Refworld.

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