Last Updated: Monday, 22 December 2014, 21:54 GMT

Mauritius: Follow-up to MUS37126.E of 11 June 2001 on the treatment of unmarried Muslim women who live alone, without the protection of immediate family members

Publisher Canada: Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada
Author Research Directorate, Immigration and Refugee Board, Canada
Publication Date 15 August 2001
Citation / Document Symbol MUS37727.E
Reference 5
Cite as Canada: Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada, Mauritius: Follow-up to MUS37126.E of 11 June 2001 on the treatment of unmarried Muslim women who live alone, without the protection of immediate family members, 15 August 2001, MUS37727.E, available at: http://www.refworld.org/docid/3df4be754.html [accessed 23 December 2014]
DisclaimerThis is not a UNHCR publication. UNHCR is not responsible for, nor does it necessarily endorse, its content. Any views expressed are solely those of the author or publisher and do not necessarily reflect those of UNHCR, the United Nations or its Member States.

A representative of Women Living under Muslim Laws (WLUML) stated in 13 August 2001 correspondence that:

The general situation of Muslim women in Mauritius would to the outsider or even to most Mauritians appear to be good as there is no official public ban on them to work or go out. However, this is only part of the reality. Yes, Muslim women work in offices, factories, sugarcane fileds as well as in the top professions – there is also an increasing number (no figures available) who work in family businesses under the control of the men of the family; no one knows their exact economic position. The great change which has occured over the past ten years, i.e since the establishment of the Hizbullah party, is the dress code, most Muslim women now wear the head scarf and a significant minority are completely veiled.

The Muslim community is becoming a very closed community and, of course, women's freedom and ability to meet others are quite restricted. They tend to spend their life (after work) inside the family. They do not mix with others, do not go out on their own or with friends, they are always seen with members of their family. Yes, members of the Muslim community would discourage, if not sanction, living alone or without the 'protection' of family members. [There are] highly qualified Muslim women who will never dare visit [other women] or going out with a group of women friends – they are afraid of their husband, father, brothers and other male relative.

This Response was prepared after researching publicly accessible information currently available to the Research Directorate within time constraints. This Response is not, and does not purport to be, conclusive as to the merit of any particular claim to refugee status or asylum.

Reference

Women Living Under Muslim Laws (WLUML). 13 August 2001. Correspondence with representative.

Copyright notice: This document is published with the permission of the copyright holder and producer Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada (IRB). The original version of this document may be found on the offical website of the IRB at http://www.irb-cisr.gc.ca/en/. Documents earlier than 2003 may be found only on Refworld.

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