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Mali: Information on the general political climate in March 1992 and on whether there were any uprisings, demonstrations or other disturbances, and if so what was the general nature of these disturbances and who were the parties involved

Publisher Canada: Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada
Author Research Directorate, Immigration and Refugee Board, Canada
Publication Date 1 February 1993
Citation / Document Symbol MLI13105
Cite as Canada: Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada, Mali: Information on the general political climate in March 1992 and on whether there were any uprisings, demonstrations or other disturbances, and if so what was the general nature of these disturbances and who were the parties involved, 1 February 1993, MLI13105, available at: http://www.refworld.org/docid/3ae6abcb5c.html [accessed 30 October 2014]
DisclaimerThis is not a UNHCR publication. UNHCR is not responsible for, nor does it necessarily endorse, its content. Any views expressed are solely those of the author or publisher and do not necessarily reflect those of UNHCR, the United Nations or its Member States.

 

There have been several reports of unrest in Mali between the Malian government and Tuareg groups (Europa 1992 1992, 1828). In early March 1992 Tuareg groups accused the Malian government of contravening their truce agreement (Ibid.).

In a report dated 9 March 1992 Agence France Presse corroborated that Malian soldiers broke the truce agreement between the government and Tuareg nomad groups (AFP 9 Mar. 1992). The source states that on 15 and 22 February 1992 Malian soldiers attacked Tuareg settlements (Ibid.). The Tuaregs, a nomadic people of three million throughout the region demand an independent state on their territory of Azawad, in northern Mali and Niger (Ibid.).

According to Agence France Presse, the coordinator of the four Tuareg parties accused the Malian government of increasing the number of its soldiers in the north, and he also reported on a recent "massacre of 16 civilians in a camp by Army men" (6 Mar. 1992).

According to Agence France Presse, although the Tuaregs agreed to stop attacking civilians and the government in return to release Tuareg prisoners, Tuareg nomads have been raiding villages in Mali and attacking tourists (15 Mar. 1992).

Around 25 March 1992 the Mali government and rebel Tuaregs finally reached an agreement to end two years of conflict (AFP 25 Mar. 1992).

Additional or corroborating information could not be found among the sources currently available to the DIRB in Ottawa.

References

Agence France Presse (AFP). 9 March 1992. "Tuaregs Accuse Malian Army of Killings." (NEXIS)

. 15 March 1992. "Mali Government, Tuareg Rebels in Final Peace Talks." (NEXIS)

. 25 March 1992. "Mali Rebel Tuaregs Agree Peace Pact." (NEXIS)

Agence France Presse (AFP) [in French]. 3 March 1992. "Tuareg Movements Issue Warning to Government." (FBIS-AFR-92-045 6 March 1992, 26)

The Europa World Year Book 1992. 1992. Vol. 2. London: Europa Publications Ltd.

Attachments

Agence France Presse (AFP). 9 March 1992. "Tuaregs Accuse Malian Army of Killings." (NEXIS)

. 15 March 1992. "Mali Government, Tuareg Rebels in Final Peace Talks." (NEXIS)

. 25 March 1992. "Mali Rebel Tuaregs Agree Peace Pact." (NEXIS)

Agence France Presse (AFP) [in French]. 3 March 1992. "Tuareg Movements Issue Warning to Government." (FBIS-AFR-92-045 6 March 1992, 26) Paris France-Inter Radio Network [in French]. 25 March 1992. "Government, Touareg Rebels Conclude Peace Accord." (FBIS-AFR-92-058 25 March 1992, p. 22)

Copyright notice: This document is published with the permission of the copyright holder and producer Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada (IRB). The original version of this document may be found on the offical website of the IRB at http://www.irb-cisr.gc.ca/en/. Documents earlier than 2003 may be found only on Refworld.

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