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Greece: Whether Greece has a mandatory retirement age; whether it is the same for public and private sectors (2004 - May 2006)

Publisher Canada: Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada
Author Research Directorate, Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada, Ottawa
Publication Date 18 May 2006
Citation / Document Symbol GRC101331.E
Reference 2
Cite as Canada: Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada, Greece: Whether Greece has a mandatory retirement age; whether it is the same for public and private sectors (2004 - May 2006), 18 May 2006, GRC101331.E, available at: http://www.refworld.org/docid/45f1473b11.html [accessed 3 September 2014]
DisclaimerThis is not a UNHCR publication. UNHCR is not responsible for, nor does it necessarily endorse, its content. Any views expressed are solely those of the author or publisher and do not necessarily reflect those of UNHCR, the United Nations or its Member States.

In a 17 May 2006 telephone interview, the first secretary of the Embassy of Greece in Canada indicated that there is no mandatory age of retirement in Greece and that this situation is the same for both the public and private sector.

The first secretary explained that in the public sector, people who entered the work force after 1993 must wait until the age of 65 to retire, regardless of the number of years worked (Greece 17 May 2006). The private sector is following this trend (ibid.).

The Independent, a London-based newspaper, also indicated that the "basic" retirement age in Greece was 65 years for men and 60 for women (30 Nov. 2005).

A 2005 report issued by the Ministry of Employment and Social Protection of Greece, provided more details on the age of retirement for people who entered the work force before and after 1993 and the minimum age of retirement for women:

[U]nder Law 2084/92, a single retirement age limit for men and women was stipulated for those persons who were insured starting from 1-1-1993, that is they can legally retire at 65 years of age. One of the few differences that are still in force, which actually refer only to those persons who were insured before 1.1.1993, are the retirement age limits and the special clauses for mothers. As a rule, the age limit for women is 5 years lower than for men (65 years for men and 60 years for women), while there are still some differences concerning the retirement conditions for mothers with minor or disabled children, which are justified by the effort to support the pension income of those women, who chose to retire from active employment earlier, because of family obligations or problems.

According to a 1 August 2005 Athens News Agency (ANA) article, Panos Panayiotopoulos, Greek Employment and Social Protection Minister, declared that his government would not raise the age of retirement for women, despite rumours that the European Union was pressuring Greece to take this measure.

Another ANA article stated that the National Union of Social Policy Organizations' Personnel objected to the possibility of raising the age of retirement, arguing that it was already high in Greece at an average of 63.9 years for men and 62.4 years for women (29 Mar. 2006). However, European Pensions and Investments News (EPN), a magazine that provides "information and analysis on all aspects of the investment of employer-supported retirement institutions" (EPN n.d.) stated that "[a]lthough the standard retirement age [in Greece] is 65, the average retirement age is very low, at 60.4 years" (30 Jan. 2006).

This Response was prepared after researching publicly accessible information currently available to the Research Directorate within time constraints. This Response is not, and does not purport to be, conclusive as to the merit of any particular claim for refugee protection. Please find below the list of additional sources consulted in researching this Information Request.

References

Athens News Agency (ANA). 29 March 2006. "Report Highlights Problems in Greek Pension System." (Factiva)
_____. 1 August 2005. "Government Denies Plans to Raise Retirement Age for Women." (Factiva)

European Pensions and Investments News (EPN). 30 January 2006. Reeta Cevik. "Pensions Snapshot: Greece." (Factiva)
_____. N.d. "About EPN." [Accessed 17 May 2006]

Greece. 17 May 2006. Embassy of Greece, Ottawa. Telephone interview with the first secretary.
_____. 2005. "The Greek National Strategy Report on Pensions." Ministry of Employment and Social Protection of Greece, General Secretariat of Social Security. [Accessed 15 May 2006]

The Independent. 30 November 2005. "A look at pensions plans worldwide." [Accessed 15 May 2006]

Additional Sources Consulted

Oral sources: The General Secretariat of Social Security of the Ministry of Employment and Social Protection of Greece did not provide information within the time constraints of this Response.

Attempts to reach the Social Insurance Institute (IKA) in Greece were not successful.

Internet sites, including: AARP, Embassy of Greece in Canada, The Employers Forum on Age, Factiva, Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development, Prime Minister of the Hellenic Republic, Social Insurance Institute.

Copyright notice: This document is published with the permission of the copyright holder and producer Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada (IRB). The original version of this document may be found on the offical website of the IRB at http://www.irb-cisr.gc.ca/en/. Documents earlier than 2003 may be found only on Refworld.

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