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Guinea-Bissau: Judiciary police, including function, jurisdiction, relations with other police forces and whether its members have been implicated in human rights abuses (1993-February 2001)

Publisher Canada: Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada
Author Research Directorate, Immigration and Refugee Board, Canada
Publication Date 19 February 2001
Citation / Document Symbol GNB36461.E
Reference 2
Cite as Canada: Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada, Guinea-Bissau: Judiciary police, including function, jurisdiction, relations with other police forces and whether its members have been implicated in human rights abuses (1993-February 2001), 19 February 2001, GNB36461.E, available at: http://www.refworld.org/docid/3df4be374.html [accessed 16 September 2014]
DisclaimerThis is not a UNHCR publication. UNHCR is not responsible for, nor does it necessarily endorse, its content. Any views expressed are solely those of the author or publisher and do not necessarily reflect those of UNHCR, the United Nations or its Member States.

Specific information on the judiciary police, including its function, jurisdiction, relations with other police forces and whether its members have been implicated in human rights abuses could not be found among the sources consulted by the Research Directorate.

However, the following Amnesty International description of the Guinea-Bissau's criminal justice system before the 7 June 1998 conflict, may be of interest:

a judiciary whose independence has been undermined by flawed practices in the appointment of senior magistrates;

the absence or inadequacy of the 'organic laws' establishing the structure and functioning of the criminal justice system and of operational regulations – this would apply particularly to laws governing the police;

the serious lack of resources in the judicial system, including for: a system of funding to provide free legal counsel for defendants unable to afford it; the supervision by the courts of the rights of untried detainees and convicted prisoners; and social assistance for juvenile offenders;

the conception of the role of the police as a purely repressive agency instead of one which is impartial and respects the presumption of innocence of suspects and which is "representative of and responsive and accountable to the community as a whole"[ Preamble, United Nations Code of Conduct for Law Enforcement Officials of 17 December 1979.];

the inadequate or flawed recruitment and promotion practices and training of the police;

the absence or ineffectiveness of procedures for receiving and responding to complaints against police abuse or of systems of police inspection;

a salary structure which fails to ensure adequate living conditions for magistrates, lawyers, police and prison officials, invites corruption and undermines the criminal justice system;

a prison system which fails to conform to the UN Standard Minimum Rules for the Treatment of Prisoners (28 Apr. 1999).

This Response was prepared after researching publicly accessible information currently available to the Research Directorate within time constraints. This Response is not, and does not purport to be, conclusive as to the merit of any particular claim to refugee status or asylum. Please find below the list of additional sources consulted in researching this Information Request.

Reference

Amnesty International (AI). 28 April 1999. "Guinea-Bissau: Protecting Human Rights-A New Era?" (AI Index: AFR 30/004/1999) http:www.amnesty.org/ai/nsf/ ... ument&of=Countries%4Cguinea-Bissau [Accessed 19 Feb. 2001]

Additional Sources Consulted

Africa Confidential 1993-2000.

Africa Research Bulletin 1993-2000.

IRB Databases.

Resource Centre country file. Guinea-Bissau.

LEXIS/NEXIS.

REWORLD.

Internet Websites, including:

Amnesty International Online.

Human Rights Watch (HRW) Online.

UN Commission for Human Rights.

Relief Web.

Search Engines, including:

Dogpile.

Google.

Lycos.

Yahoo.

Copyright notice: This document is published with the permission of the copyright holder and producer Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada (IRB). The original version of this document may be found on the offical website of the IRB at http://www.irb-cisr.gc.ca/en/. Documents earlier than 2003 may be found only on Refworld.

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