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Romania: Information on whether ethnic Hungarian Romanians in the armed forces are treated differently from other Romanian citizens in the armed forces

Publisher Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada
Author Research Directorate, Immigration and Refugee Board, Canada
Publication Date 1 February 1995
Citation / Document Symbol ROM19538.E
Cite as Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada, Romania: Information on whether ethnic Hungarian Romanians in the armed forces are treated differently from other Romanian citizens in the armed forces, 1 February 1995, ROM19538.E, available at: http://www.refworld.org/docid/3ae6ac8f1c.html [accessed 21 April 2014]
DisclaimerThis is not a UNHCR publication. UNHCR is not responsible for, nor does it necessarily endorse, its content. Any views expressed are solely those of the author or publisher and do not necessarily reflect those of UNHCR, the United Nations or its Member States.

 

For partial information on the above-mentioned subject, please consult Response to Information Request ROM19080.E of 14 December 1994.

In a telephone interview on 2 February 1995, a lecturer in east European studies at the School of Slavonic and East European Studies at the University of London, provided the following information. The lecturer has heard of anecdotal evidence and reports, which he regards as trustworthy, indicating that the situation of ethnic Hungarians in the armed forces is generally worse than for non-Hungarians. He stated that Hungarians in the armed forces may be the victims of bullying, that there is no consistency in how they are treated, and that their treatment may depend upon how individual officers react to them.

In a telephone interview on 3 February 1995, a professor of Romanian studies at the School of Slavonic and East European Studies at the same university provided the following information. The professor stated that he had not heard reports of any conscripts in the armed forces being discriminated against on the basis of their ethnicity. The professor added, however, that for security reasons it would be unlikely for an ethnic Hungarian to be appointed to a sensitive security post in the armed forces.

For additional information on the situation of ethnic Hungarians in the armed forces, please consult the attachment.

This response was prepared after researching publicly accessible information currently available to the DIRB within time constraints. This response is not, and does not purport to be, conclusive as to the merit of any particular claim to refugee status or asylum.

References

Lecturer in east European studies, School of Slavonic and East European Studies, University of London, England. 2 February 1995. Telephone interview.

Professor of Romanian studies, School of Slavonic and East European Studies, University of London, England. 3 February 1995. Telephone interview.

Attachment

Magyar Nemzet [Budapest, in Hungarian]. 22 December 1994. "Minister Denies 'Militarization' of Szeklerland." (FBIS-EEU-94-248 27 December 1994, p. 38)

Copyright notice: This document is published with the permission of the copyright holder and producer Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada (IRB). The original version of this document may be found on the offical website of the IRB at http://www.irb-cisr.gc.ca/en/. Documents earlier than 2003 may be found only on Refworld.

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