Last Updated: Friday, 26 December 2014, 13:50 GMT

Czech Republic: Information regarding the surname that is used on birth certificates for children of common-law relationships

Publisher Canada: Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada
Author Research Directorate, Immigration and Refugee Board, Canada
Publication Date 24 October 2002
Citation / Document Symbol CZE40266.E
Reference 5
Cite as Canada: Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada, Czech Republic: Information regarding the surname that is used on birth certificates for children of common-law relationships, 24 October 2002, CZE40266.E, available at: http://www.refworld.org/docid/3f7d4d8b7.html [accessed 27 December 2014]
DisclaimerThis is not a UNHCR publication. UNHCR is not responsible for, nor does it necessarily endorse, its content. Any views expressed are solely those of the author or publisher and do not necessarily reflect those of UNHCR, the United Nations or its Member States.

According to the Vice Consul of the Consulate General of the Czech Republic in Montreal, Section 38 of Act No. 94 of 1 April 1964 on Family Law provides that children are given the common surname of their parents, or the surname of one of them (if they decided so when they got married) (23 Oct. 2002). The surname of the child can be decided upon by the parents after their marriage, provided that they inform the registry office (vital statistics) of their decision (ibid.). Where the parents of the child are not married, the parents are required to fill out and sign "The Protocol About the Filiation By An Affirmative Declaration of the Parents" following the child's birth (ibid.). One of the questions to be answered in this document concerns the surname of the child: "Parents have decided that the child will use the surname __________" (ibid.).

If the parents cannot agree on the surname of their child, or if the parents are not known, a surname is given to the child by the court (ibid.).

This Response was prepared after researching publicly accessible information currently available to the Research Directorate within time constraints. This Response is not, and does not purport to be, conclusive as to the merit of any particular claim to refugee status or asylum.

Reference

Czech Republic. Consulate General of the Czech Republic. 23 October 2002. Correspondence received from the Vice Consul.

Copyright notice: This document is published with the permission of the copyright holder and producer Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada (IRB). The original version of this document may be found on the offical website of the IRB at http://www.irb-cisr.gc.ca/en/. Documents earlier than 2003 may be found only on Refworld.

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