Last Updated: Tuesday, 22 July 2014, 14:56 GMT

Bulgaria: Whether Romani men and women generally dress differently than ethnic Bulgarians do (1999-March 2000)

Publisher Canada: Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada
Author Research Directorate, Immigration and Refugee Board, Canada
Publication Date 31 March 2000
Citation / Document Symbol BGR34107.E
Reference 7
Cite as Canada: Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada, Bulgaria: Whether Romani men and women generally dress differently than ethnic Bulgarians do (1999-March 2000), 31 March 2000, BGR34107.E, available at: http://www.refworld.org/docid/3ae6ad4b58.html [accessed 23 July 2014]
DisclaimerThis is not a UNHCR publication. UNHCR is not responsible for, nor does it necessarily endorse, its content. Any views expressed are solely those of the author or publisher and do not necessarily reflect those of UNHCR, the United Nations or its Member States.

Information on whether Romani men and women generally dress differently than ethnic Bulgarians is scarce among the sources consulted by the Research Directorate.

In a 24 March 2000 telephone interview, a Bulgarian ethnologist chairing the Minority Studies Society Studii Romani, said that Roma usually wear the same clothes as ethnic Bulgarians, although there may be differences due to the heterogeneity of the Romani minority. For instance, Muslim Roma tend to wear what she described as "Muslim" clothes. This information was corroborated by the Chair of the Bulgarian Helsinki Committee interviewed on 28 March 2000. The latter further added that the clothes that Roma wear reflect their poverty, and not their ethnicity.

In a 21 March 2000 telephone interview, the Executive Director of the Sofia-based Human Rights Project stated that Roma usually wear colourful and shabby clothes, regardless of age. She further said that Roma have their traditional clothes which they wear for special occasions.

This Response was prepared after researching publicly accessible information currently available to the Research Directorate within time constraints. This Response is not, and does not purport to be, conclusive as to the merit of any particular claim to refugee status or asylum. Please find below the list of additional sources consulted in researching this Information Request.

Bulgarian Helsinki Committee, Sofia. 28 March 2000. Telephone interview with the Chair.

Human Rights Project, Sofia. 21 March 2000. Telephone interview with the Executive Director.

Minority Studies Society Studii Romani. Sofia. 27 March 2000. Telephone interview with the Chair.

Additional Sources Consulted

Amnesty International Report 1999 1999

Human Rights Watch World Report 2000

IRB Databases

Public Affairs International Service 1999-2000

Resource Centre country file on Bulgaria. 1999-2000

World News Connection (WNC)

Unsuccessful attempts to contact two oral sources.

Internet Sites Including:

European Centre for Minority Issues (ECMI)

European Roma Rights Centre

Minority Electronic Resources (MINELRES)

Minority Rights Group International

Minorities at Risk

OSCE Contact Point for Roma and Sinti Issues

Project on Ethnic Relations (PER)

Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty

Copyright notice: This document is published with the permission of the copyright holder and producer Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada (IRB). The original version of this document may be found on the offical website of the IRB at http://www.irb-cisr.gc.ca/en/. Documents earlier than 2003 may be found only on Refworld.

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