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Russia: Information on the Buryat Autonomous Republic

Publisher Canada: Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada
Author Research Directorate, Immigration and Refugee Board, Canada
Publication Date 1 January 1992
Citation / Document Symbol RUS10112
Cite as Canada: Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada, Russia: Information on the Buryat Autonomous Republic, 1 January 1992, RUS10112, available at: http://www.refworld.org/docid/3ae6ab0068.html [accessed 18 December 2014]
DisclaimerThis is not a UNHCR publication. UNHCR is not responsible for, nor does it necessarily endorse, its content. Any views expressed are solely those of the author or publisher and do not necessarily reflect those of UNHCR, the United Nations or its Member States.

 

The Buryat Autonomous Republic (ASSR) is located along the border of Russia and Mongolia (Caratini 1990, 261; Kozlov 1988, 17). The population of the Buryat ASSR in 1979 was approximately 72 percent ethnic Russian, 23 percent ethnic Buryat and 5 percent other ethnic groups (Caratini 1990, 250; Kozlov 1988, 80). The president of the ASSR is Sergei Buldayev (People in Power 1 Oct. 1991, 157). According to Dictionnaire des nationalités et des minorités en URSS, the Buryat people are of Mongol origin and their religion is a combination of shamanism and Buddhism (Caratini 1990, 50-51). Radio Free Europe and Minority Rights Group reports indicate that Buddhists have faced difficulties in practising their religion in the past (RFE 27 Sept. 1991, 11; MRG World Directory 1989, 159; MRG Religious Minorities 1984, 18). However, it appears that there is currently a revival in Buddhism in the Soviet Union, including the restoration of a number of temples (RFE 27 Sept. 1991, 10; MRG Soviet Minorities Update Jan. 1991, 3).

Please see the attached articles for details related to this topic. There is no further information currently available to the IRBDC on the Buryat ASSR or on the Buryat ethnic group.

Bibliography

Caratini, Roger. 1990. Dictionnaire des nationalités et des minorités en URSS. Paris: Larousse.

Kozlov, Viktor. 1988 (English translation). The Peoples of the Soviet Union. London: Hutchinson Education and Bloomington, Indianna: Indiana University Press.

Minority Rights Group (MRG). January 1991. Soviet Minorities Update Pack. "Religious Minorities in the Soviet Union." London: Longman Group UK Ltd.

. 1989. World Directory of Minorities. London: Longman Group UK Ltd.

. 1984. Religious Minorities in the Soviet Union. London: Longman Group UK Ltd.

People in Power. 1 October 1991. Release No. 26. London: Longman Group UK, Ltd.

Radio Free Europe (RFE). 27 September 1991. Vol. 3, No. 39. Report on the USSR. Antic, Oxana. "Revival of Buddhism in the Soviet Union."

Attachments

Caratini, Roger. 1990. Dictionnaire des nationalités et des minorités en URSS. Paris: Larousse.

Kozlov, Viktor. 1988 (English translation). The Peoples of the Soviet Union. London: Hutchinson Education and Bloomington, Indianna: Indiana University Press.

Minority Rights Group (MRG). January 1991. Soviet Minorities Update Pack. "Religious Minorities in the Soviet Union." London: Longman Group UK Ltd.

. 1989. World Directory of Minorities. London: Longman Group UK Ltd.

. 1984. Religious Minorities in the Soviet Union. London: Longman Group UK Ltd.

Radio Free Europe. 27 September 1991. Vol. 3, No. 39. Report on the USSR. Antic, Oxana. "Revival of Buddhism in the Soviet Union."

Copyright notice: This document is published with the permission of the copyright holder and producer Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada (IRB). The original version of this document may be found on the offical website of the IRB at http://www.irb-cisr.gc.ca/en/. Documents earlier than 2003 may be found only on Refworld.

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