Last Updated: Wednesday, 20 August 2014, 08:51 GMT

Iran: Information in addition to that contained in IRN10553 of 23 March 1992 on the treatment of Baluchis in Iran

Publisher Canada: Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada
Author Research Directorate, Immigration and Refugee Board, Canada
Publication Date 1 September 1994
Citation / Document Symbol IRN18156.E
Cite as Canada: Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada, Iran: Information in addition to that contained in IRN10553 of 23 March 1992 on the treatment of Baluchis in Iran, 1 September 1994, IRN18156.E, available at: http://www.refworld.org/docid/3ae6aaf96c.html [accessed 20 August 2014]
DisclaimerThis is not a UNHCR publication. UNHCR is not responsible for, nor does it necessarily endorse, its content. Any views expressed are solely those of the author or publisher and do not necessarily reflect those of UNHCR, the United Nations or its Member States.

 

The attached Reuters article refers to a riot in the city of Zahedan, the capital of Sistan va Baluchestan Province, in protest of the destruction of a Sunni mosque in the city of Mashad in Khorasan Province (1 Feb. 1994). Quoting an Iranian opposition group, Agence France Presse refers to the suppression of "uprisings" in a few Iranian cities including Zahedan (11 Feb. 1994).

Referring to the Zahedan riot, Middle East Intelligence Report indicates that martial law was declared in Sistan va Baluchestan; the source also mentions attacks by armed Baluchis on military vehicles (10 Feb. 1994). The report quotes an Iranian government statement which attributed the riot in Zahedan to "brigands and smugglers" whose interests had been endangered because of Iranian security operations in the region (ibid.).

According to a Mideast Mirror article, the Arab magazine Al-Wasat claims that "the recent unrest among Sunnites in the southeast of ... Iran [including the anti-government riot in Zahedan] could be the work of separatists aided by both Sunnite fundamentalists and drug-trafficking gangs from across the border in Afghanistan and Pakistan" (11 Feb. 1994). The Arab magazine suggests that the destruction of a Sunni mosque in Mashad was "deliberately staged to fuel sectarian passions throughout Khorasan and Baluchistan" (ibid.). Al-Wasat adds that an Afghan Mujahideen leader has been

sponsoring the creation of a secessionist movement in Iranian Baluchistan, and has been supplying to groups and tribes engaged in cross-border drug-smuggling and encouraging them to secede from Iran. Traffickers in the area, the so-called Golden Crescent, have been stepping up anti-government activity in recent months since the Iranian and Pakistani authorities agreed to join forces to crush them (ibid.).

The article refers to an interview with a spokesman of an Iranian Baluchi group called Armed Sunnite Opposition with clear Afghan Mujahideen connections (ibid.).

Amnesty International Report 1994 refers to the existence of "members of ... groups representing ethnic minorities such as Baluchis and Arabs" among Iranian political prisoners (1994, 163). The report adds that

[o]ver 20 Baluchis were reported in the press and by unofficial sources to have been executed between December 1992 and February 1993. Some were said to have been detained without charge or trail for over a year; others had reportedly been charged with drug-trafficking, armed robbery or counter-revolutionary activities (ibid., 164).

An Inter Press Service article refers to an Amnesty International report on the abuse of minorities including Baluchis in Iran "who have suffered a steady series of executions" (17 Nov. 1993). The article also refers to the alleged murder by Iranian authorities of two members of the Iranian Baluchi Naroui Tribe in Pakistan (ibid.).

Although not referring to the treatment of Baluchis, the following information might be useful. Quoting the Iranian official news agency, AFP reports that during a shoot-out, Iranian security forces killed a suspected drug baron along with several members of his gang in "the mountains of southeastern Iran near the Pakistani border" (13 June 1994). During the period 1989 to 1990, the mentioned gang "killed several Revolutionary Guards militiamen around the city of Zahedan" (ibid.).

This response was prepared after researching publicly accessible information currently available to the DIRB within time constraints. This response is not, and does not purport to be, conclusive as to the merit of any particular claim to refugee status or asylum.

References

Agence France Presse (AFP). 13 June 1994. "Police Kill Suspected Drug Baron." (NEXIS)

. 11 February 1994. "Exiled Opposition Says Tehran Authorities Ruined Iran." (NEXIS)

Amnesty International. 1994. Amnesty International Report 1994. New York: Amnesty International USA.

Inter Press Service (IPS). 17 November 1993. Moyra Ashford. "Iran-Human Rights: Serious Abuses Persist, Says Amnesty." (NEXIS)

Mideast Mirror [London]. 11 February 1994. "Afghan Chief Suspected of Fuelling Sunnite 'Separatism' in Iran." (NEXIS)

Middle East Intelligence Report [London]. 10 February 1994. "Martial Law Declared in Sistan Va Baluchestan." (NEXIS)

Reuters. 1 February 1994. BC Cycle. "Riots, Gunfire Exchanges Erupt in Iranian Town." (NEXIS)

Attachments

Agence France Presse (AFP). 13 June 1994. "Police Kill Suspected Drug Baron." (NEXIS)

. 11 February 1994. "Exiled Opposition Says Tehran Authorities Ruined Iran." (NEXIS)

Inter Press Service (IPS). 17 November 1993. Moyra Ashford. "Iran-Human Rights: Serious Abuses Persist, Says Amnesty." (NEXIS)

Mideast Mirror [London]. 11 February 1994. "Afghan Chief Suspected of Fuelling Sunnite 'Separatism' in Iran." (NEXIS)

Middle East Intelligence Report [London]. 10 February 1994. "Martial Law Declared in Sistan Va Baluchestan." (NEXIS)

Reuters. 1 February 1994. BC Cycle. "Riots, Gunfire Exchanges Erupt in Iranian Town." (NEXIS)

Copyright notice: This document is published with the permission of the copyright holder and producer Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada (IRB). The original version of this document may be found on the offical website of the IRB at http://www.irb-cisr.gc.ca/en/. Documents earlier than 2003 may be found only on Refworld.

Search Refworld

Topics