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Angola: The Nganguela ethnic group, including its relationship with the Ovimbundu ethnic group and the treatment of its members by the government; whether members of this ethnic group are considered to be supporters of the National Union for the Total Independence of Angola (UNITA) (July 2002)

Publisher Canada: Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada
Author Research Directorate, Immigration and Refugee Board, Canada
Publication Date 23 July 2002
Citation / Document Symbol AGO39212.FE
Reference 2
Cite as Canada: Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada, Angola: The Nganguela ethnic group, including its relationship with the Ovimbundu ethnic group and the treatment of its members by the government; whether members of this ethnic group are considered to be supporters of the National Union for the Total Independence of Angola (UNITA) (July 2002), 23 July 2002, AGO39212.FE, available at: http://www.refworld.org/docid/3f7d4d4d26.html [accessed 23 September 2014]
DisclaimerThis is not a UNHCR publication. UNHCR is not responsible for, nor does it necessarily endorse, its content. Any views expressed are solely those of the author or publisher and do not necessarily reflect those of UNHCR, the United Nations or its Member States.

Referring to the Nganguela ethnic group, Angola: A Country Study commented: "Nganguela (also spelled Ganguela) is a term, pejorative in connotation, applied by the Ovimbundu to the peoples living east and southeast of them" (United States Feb. 1989). Without naming them, the same source of information noted that "[o]nly two groups in the western section of the territory accepted the name Nganguela; the others carried names such as Lwena (or Lovale), Mbunda, and Luchazi--all in the eastern division" (ibid.).

In its report of April 2002 on Angola, the United Kingdom's Immigration and Nationality Directorate (IND) reported that the Nganguela ethnic group formed 6 per cent of the population of Angola and was divided into 20 main tribes:

Luimbe, Lovale, Lutchazi, Bunda, Ganguila, Ambuela, Ambuila-Mambumbo, Econjeiro, Ngonoielo, Mbande, Cangale, Iahuma, Gengista, Nicoia, Canachi, Ndungo, Nhengo, Nhemba, [and] Avico.

Describing the history of the Nganguela group's social and political relations, Angola: A Country Study stated that "[t]he western division, adjacent to the Ovimbundu, was most heavily represented in the Ovimbundu-dominated UNITA. Some of the groups in the eastern divisions were represented in the MPLA-PTA [Popular Movement for the Liberation of Angola-Workers' Party of Angola], which Mbundu and mestiços dominated" (United States Feb. 1989).

Current information on possible links between the Nganguela ethnic group and the National Union for the Total Independence of Angola (UNITA), as well as information on the treatment of members of this ethnic group by the government could not be found among the sources consulted by the Research Directorate within time constraints.

This Response was prepared after researching publicly accessible information currently available to the Research Directorate within time constraints. This Response is not, and does not purport to be, conclusive as to the merit of any particular claim to refugee status or asylum. Please find below the list of additional sources consulted in researching this Information Request.

References

United Kingdom. April 2002. Immigration and Nationality Directorate (IND). Angola Assessment. [Accessed 22 July 2002]

United States. February 1989. Library of Congress. Angola: A Country Study. "Angola: Nganguela." [Accessed 22 July 2002]

Additional Sources Consulted

Africa Confidential 2000-2002.

Africa Research Bulletin 2000-Mar. 2002.

IRB Databases.

Jeune Afrique/L'Intelligent Jan.-July 2002.

LEXIS/NEXIS.

Mondes rebelles 2001.

Resource Centre country file. Angola.

Internet sites including:

Africatime.

Allafrica

Amnesty International.

Angola Alert.

Angola Peace Monitor [Luanda].

Angola Press News Agency [Luanda].

BBC.

Human Rights Watch.

The Inter-African Network for Human Rights.

Mail and Guardian [Johannesburg].

Media Institute of Southern Africa (MISA).

Minorities at Risk Project.

Reliefweb.

United Nations Human Rights Commission.

Copyright notice: This document is published with the permission of the copyright holder and producer Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada (IRB). The original version of this document may be found on the offical website of the IRB at http://www.irb-cisr.gc.ca/en/. Documents earlier than 2003 may be found only on Refworld.

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