Last Updated: Wednesday, 30 July 2014, 15:15 GMT

El Salvador: Issuance of a multiple-entry visa for the United States of America in San Salvador (criteria, waiting period for application, other) 1989-1991

Publisher Canada: Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada
Author Research Directorate, Immigration and Refugee Board, Canada
Publication Date 1 January 1991
Citation / Document Symbol SLV7541
Cite as Canada: Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada, El Salvador: Issuance of a multiple-entry visa for the United States of America in San Salvador (criteria, waiting period for application, other) 1989-1991, 1 January 1991, SLV7541, available at: http://www.refworld.org/docid/3ae6ad2844.html [accessed 31 July 2014]
DisclaimerThis is not a UNHCR publication. UNHCR is not responsible for, nor does it necessarily endorse, its content. Any views expressed are solely those of the author or publisher and do not necessarily reflect those of UNHCR, the United Nations or its Member States.

 

The standard form for requesting a non-immigrant visa for the United States of America, Optional Form 156 (Rev. 6/82), can be provided to the requester by the U.S. Consulate in Toronto [telephone number (416) 595-1700].

According to the Consulate of the United States of America in Ottawa, as stated in an interview with the IRBDC on 14 January 1991, the Optional Form 156 (Rev 6/82) is the standard form used in all countries by consular staff. A Spanish-language version of the form, which is normally available at consulates in Latin America, can also be obtained through the U.S. Consulate in Toronto. The form indicates requirements and criteria for issuing or denying a non-immigrant visa.

According to the Consulate of the Unites States of America in Ottawa, a person who wishes to visit the United States can obtain a multiple-entry visa valid for a specific period of time (normally up to five years). Only "high-profile" individuals and certain foreign government authorities may obtain a visa without undergoing the normal procedures.

The Salvador Desk of the U.S. Department of State stated in a telephone communication with the IRBDC on 14 January 1991 that the criteria for granting multiple-entry visas for the United States of America to Salvadoreans is the same as for other countries. The source stated that a person must "overcome the presumption of intended migration" by presenting proof of binding commitments in El Salvador. Exclusion criteria which justify denial of a visa are spelled out in the pertinent legislation with no particular consideration for Salvadoreans. Finally, the Salvador Desk indicated that the final decision on the granting of a visa rests with the officer processing the application. A person who has been denied a visa may appeal, although not in a legal or formal sense: a superior officer may be asked to review the application and determine the validity of the denial, and the decision may be overturned.

The Consulate of the United States of America in Ottawa explained that the waiting period for a non-immigrant visa request depends on the workload of the specific Consulate handling the application. As an example, an application submitted in Ottawa could be processed the same day, while in Toronto the same process might take two days. The source indicated that Federal Bureau of Investigations' security checks can delay the procedure, but are performed only when an individual is suspected of being a criminal.

The Consular Section of the Embassy of the United States of America in San Salvador indicated in a telephone communication with the IRBDC on 14 January 1991 that applications for a non-immigrant visa are normally processed the same day they are presented. The source added that the criteria used for issuing non-immigrant visas is the same as that outlined in the standard form mentioned above, with applicants being required to present proof of a "binding commitment" (see attached forms) in El Salvador in order to be eligible.

The Consulate of the United States of America in Ottawa stated that, as indicated in the attached forms, a multiple-entry visa is not a guarantee of entry. Immigration officers at ports of entry determine how long a person will be allowed to stay in the United States of America and can deny entry based on their assessment of the individual. The source added that individuals who have applied for immigration to the United States become ineligible for non-immigrant visas. They may request a non-immigrant visa only after they have completed the immigration selection process, which could take several years.

Additional and/or corroborating information on the requested subject could not be found among the sources currently available to the IRBDC.

Copyright notice: This document is published with the permission of the copyright holder and producer Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada (IRB). The original version of this document may be found on the offical website of the IRB at http://www.irb-cisr.gc.ca/en/. Documents earlier than 2003 may be found only on Refworld.

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