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Bulgaria: Treatment by the general population and by the authorities of well-integrated or assimilated Roma, particularly in large urban centres such as Sofia and Plovdiv; whether it differs from the treatment afforded to highly visible Roma who live in Romani communities (1999-2000)

Publisher Canada: Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada
Author Research Directorate, Immigration and Refugee Board, Canada
Publication Date 3 April 2000
Citation / Document Symbol BGR34108.E
Reference 7
Cite as Canada: Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada, Bulgaria: Treatment by the general population and by the authorities of well-integrated or assimilated Roma, particularly in large urban centres such as Sofia and Plovdiv; whether it differs from the treatment afforded to highly visible Roma who live in Romani communities (1999-2000) , 3 April 2000, BGR34108.E, available at: http://www.refworld.org/docid/3ae6ac5040.html [accessed 24 July 2014]
DisclaimerThis is not a UNHCR publication. UNHCR is not responsible for, nor does it necessarily endorse, its content. Any views expressed are solely those of the author or publisher and do not necessarily reflect those of UNHCR, the United Nations or its Member States.

According to the Chair of the Minority Studies Society Studii Romani, the treatment of Bulgarian Roma by the general population and by the authorities varies according to their level of education and their ability to speak Bulgarian without any accent (27 Mar. 2000). She further said that the more educated and able to speak Bulgarian without an accent Bulgarian Roma are, the more likely they are to be treated like other Bulgarians (ibid.).

In a 28 March 2000 telephone interview, the Chair of the Bulgarian Helsinki Committee stated that the treatment of Bulgarian Roma depends on their ability not to fit the "stereotype" depicting Roma as "criminals, lazy and irresponsible people" (28 Mar. 2000). Other factors favourably affecting their treatment, according to him, include employment and a "white" skin (ibid.). He further added that these conditions were easier to meet in cities than in the countryside (ibid.).

This Response was prepared after researching publicly accessible information currently available to the Research Directorate within time constraints. This Response is not, and does not purport to be, conclusive as to the merit of any particular claim to refugee status or asylum. Please find below the list of additional sources consulted in researching this information request.

Bulgarian Helsinki Committee, Sofia. 28 March 2000. Telephone interview with the Chair.

Minority Studies Society Studii Romani. Sofia. 27 March 2000. Telephone interview with the Chair.

Additional Sources Consulted

Amnesty International Report 1999 1999

Country Report 1999.

Human Rights Watch World Report 2000

IRB Databases

Public Affairs International Service 1999-2000

Resource Centre country file on Bulgaria. 1999-2000

World News Connection (WNC)

Unsuccessful attempts to contact two oral sources.

Internet Sites Including:

European Centre for Minority Issues (ECMI)

European Roma Rights Centre

Minority Electronic Resources (MINELRES)

Minority Rights Group International

Minorities at Risk

OSCE Contact Point for Roma and Sinti Issues

Project on Ethnic Relations (PER)

Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty

 

Copyright notice: This document is published with the permission of the copyright holder and producer Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada (IRB). The original version of this document may be found on the offical website of the IRB at http://www.irb-cisr.gc.ca/en/. Documents earlier than 2003 may be found only on Refworld.

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