Last Updated: Thursday, 10 July 2014, 12:38 GMT

Russia: Update to RUS17763.E of 27 June 1994 on the use of informants by Russia's Federal Security Service (FSB), especially whether this organization engages in forced recruitment of informants or assistants; whether a person can be subjected to assaults, kidnapping, or attempts against their life by the FSB for refusing to act as an informant or assistant; and whether ships' captains face particular risks of being forcibly recruited

Publisher Canada: Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada
Author Research Directorate, Immigration and Refugee Board, Canada
Publication Date 1 May 1999
Citation / Document Symbol RUS31942.E
Cite as Canada: Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada, Russia: Update to RUS17763.E of 27 June 1994 on the use of informants by Russia's Federal Security Service (FSB), especially whether this organization engages in forced recruitment of informants or assistants; whether a person can be subjected to assaults, kidnapping, or attempts against their life by the FSB for refusing to act as an informant or assistant; and whether ships' captains face particular risks of being forcibly recruited, 1 May 1999, RUS31942.E, available at: http://www.refworld.org/docid/3ae6ac971c.html [accessed 10 July 2014]
DisclaimerThis is not a UNHCR publication. UNHCR is not responsible for, nor does it necessarily endorse, its content. Any views expressed are solely those of the author or publisher and do not necessarily reflect those of UNHCR, the United Nations or its Member States.

 

No information on forcible recruitment of informants in Russia's Federal Security Service (FSB), further to that contained in Country Reports 1998, could be found among the sources consulted by the Research Directorate.

However, a 6 January 1999 ITAR-TASS report states that findings of a special Security Council Commission inquiry on FSB activities reveal that:

No orders had been given within the FSB system mandating its officers to take actions beyond the boundaries of the Law "concerning the operational and detective activity" and other enactments. The Commission stated, nonetheless, that certain mistakes had been made in the FSB operational and service activity, including in the personnel recruitment and placement.

The report states also that Russian President Boris Yeltsin had approved the conclusions of the Commission's report and instructed the Security Council and the FSB to "take the necessary measures to eliminate the shortfalls within the shortest possible period of time."  The ITAR-TASS report does not mention whether the recruitment of informants was investigated by the commission.

Furthermore, according to the Human Rights Watch (HRW) Report 1999:

Draft regulations submitted by the Federal Security Service (FSB) regarding the Internet and E-mail would allow the security services to monitor all such communications without obtaining prior permission, through a black box Internet service providers would have to pay for  themselves.

This Response was prepared after researching publicly accessible information currently available to the Research Directorate within time constraints. This Response is not, and does not purport to be, conclusive as to the merit of any particular claim to refugee status or asylum. Please find below the list of additional sources consulted in researching this Information Request.

Reference

Human Rights Watch (HRW). Report 1999. [Internet] [Accessed: 26 May 1999]

ITAR-TASS. 6 January 1999. "Russia: Yeltsin Approves FSB Personnel Policy."   (FBIS-SOV-99-006 6 Jan. 1999/WNC)

Additional Sources Consulted

American Intelligence Study Group (AISG) Website.

Center for Civil Society International (CCSI) Website.

CIA Website.

Derechos Human Rights Website.

Electronic Sources: Internet, IRB databases, LEXIS/NEXIS, WNC.

Federation of American Scientists (FAS) Website. Intelligence Resources Program. Work on issues of global security, the environment, democratic governance and human rights.

Foreign Intelligence Services Website. (Mossad).

Intelligence Agencies of the World Website. (USA)

Institute for Journalism in Transition (IJT) Website. (Transitions)

Lawyers Committee for Human Rights (LCHR) Website.

Keesing's Record of World Events database.

Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty Website.

Copyright notice: This document is published with the permission of the copyright holder and producer Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada (IRB). The original version of this document may be found on the offical website of the IRB at http://www.irb-cisr.gc.ca/en/. Documents earlier than 2003 may be found only on Refworld.

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