Last Updated: Friday, 29 August 2014, 14:18 GMT

2005 Findings on the Worst Forms of Child Labor - Seychelles

Publisher United States Department of Labor
Author Bureau of International Labor Affairs
Publication Date 29 August 2006
Cite as United States Department of Labor, 2005 Findings on the Worst Forms of Child Labor - Seychelles, 29 August 2006, available at: http://www.refworld.org/docid/48d7490923.html [accessed 30 August 2014]
DisclaimerThis is not a UNHCR publication. UNHCR is not responsible for, nor does it necessarily endorse, its content. Any views expressed are solely those of the author or publisher and do not necessarily reflect those of UNHCR, the United Nations or its Member States.

Selected Child Labor Measures Adopted by Governments
Ratified Convention 138     (3/07/2000)
Ratified Convention 182     (9/28/1999)
ILO-IPEC Member 
National Plan for Children 
National Child Labor Action Plan 
Sector Action Plan 

Incidence and Nature of Child Labor

Statistics on the number of working children under the age of 15 in Seychelles are unavailable.4224

Education is compulsory up to the age of 16, and free through secondary school up until age 18.4225 Students must pay for uniforms, but not for books or tuition.4226 In 2002, the gross primary enrollment rate was 114 percent and the net primary enrollment rate was 100 percent.4227 Gross and net enrollment ratios are based on the number of students formally registered in primary school and therefore do not necessarily reflect actual school attendance. Primary school attendance statistics are not available for Seychelles.4228 As of 2002, 99 percent of children who started primary school were likely to reach grade 5.4229

Child Labor Laws and Enforcement

Article 31 of the Constitution protects children under age 15 from economic exploitation but allows children to be employed part-time in light work that is not harmful to their health, morals, or education.4230 The Employment Act prohibits any child under age 15 from working.4231 It is illegal to employ children between the ages of 15 and 16 in certain forms of hazardous work, and the Minister of Employment and Social Affairs has the ability to limit categories of employment in which children of this age can participate.4232 The Employment Act also considers children ages 16 to 18 as adults in the labor market, with no special protections for this age group.4233 The Employment of Young Persons and Children Act of 1981, however, prohibits the employment of persons under 18 in hotels, restaurants, and shops.4234 Violations of the minimum employment age are punishable by a fine of SCR 6,000 (USD 1,090).4235

The worst forms of child labor may be prosecuted under different statutes in Seychelles. The Constitution provides for freedom from slavery, servitude, or forced or obligatory labor.4236 The Penal Code also prohibits procuring any woman or girl for purposes of prostitution or inducing her to leave the country to enter a brothel.4237 There is no conscription, and the minimum age for voluntary military service is 18.4238 Exceptions to this rule require written permission from a parent or guardian.4239

The Ministry of Employment and Social Services enforces child labor laws and investigates claims of child labor abuses.4240

In 2004, there were no reported cases of child labor requiring investigation by the Ministry of Employment and Social Services, no known cases of forced or bonded labor by children, and no reports of trafficking in person to, from, or within the country.4241

Government Policies and Programs to Eliminate the Worst Forms of Child Labor

The Government of Seychelles has also developed a National Plan of Action for Children 2005-2009, which sets out specific goals and actions related to the continued enforcement of all child protection laws as well as the development and well-being of children in Seychelles.4242


4224 This statistic is not available from the data sources that are used in this report. Please see the "Data Sources and Definitions" section of this report for information about sources used. Reliable data on the worst forms of child labor are especially difficult to collect given the often hidden or illegal nature of the worst forms, such as the use of children in the illegal drug trade, prostitution, pornography, and trafficking. As a result, statistics and information on children's work in general are reported in this section. Such statistics and information may or may not include the worst forms of child labor. For more information on the definition of working children and other indicators used in this report, please see the "Data Sources and Definitions" section.

4225 UN Committee on the Rights of the Child, Consideration of Reports Submitted by States Parties Under Article 44 of the Convention on the Rights of the Child: Initial Reports of States Parties due in 1995: Seychelles, CRC/C/3/Add.64, United Nations, January 2002; available from http://www.unhchr.ch/tbs/doc.nsf/(Symbol)/CRC.C.3.Add.64.En?OpenDocument. para. 27, 359. See also U.S. Department of State, Country Reports on Human Rights Practices – 2004: Seychelles, Washington, D.C., February 28, 2005, Section 6d; available from http://www.state.gov/g/drl/rls/hrrpt/2004/41624.htm.

4226 U.S. Department of State, Country Reports – 2004: Seychelles, Section 5.

4227 UNESCO Institute for Statistics, http://www.uis.unesco.org/profiles/EN/EDU/countryProfile_en.aspx?code=6900 (Gross and Net Enrolment Ratios, Primary; accessed August 2006). For an explanation of gross primary enrollment rates that are greater than 100 percent, please see the definition of gross primary enrollment rate in the "Data Sources and Definitions" section of this report.

4228 This statistic is not available from the data sources that are used in this report. Please see the "Data Sources and Definitions" section for information about sources used.

4229 UNESCO Institute for Statistics, http://stats.uis.unesco.org/TableViewer/tableView.aspx?ReportId=55 (School life expectancy, % of repeaters, survival rates; accessed December 2005).

4230 UN Committee on the Rights of the Child, Consideration of Reports: Initial Reports: Seychelles.. para. 482. See also U.S. Department of State, Country Reports – 2004: Seychelles, Section 5.

4231 UN Committee on the Rights of the Child, Consideration of Reports: Initial Reports: Seychelles, para. 483.

4232 Ibid., para. 483.

4233 Ibid., para. 484.

4234 ILO, Natlex: Seychelles, [cited May 20, 2004]; available from http://www.ilo.org/dyn/natlex/natlex_browse.country?p_lang=en&p_country=SYC.

4235 U.S. Department of State, Country Reports – 2004: Seychelles, Section 6d.

4236 Droit Francophone, Seychelles: Constitution des Seychelles, 2004 [cited December 2, 2004]; available from http://droit.francophonie.org/doc/html/sc/con/fr/1993/1993dfscco1.html.

4237 The Protection Project, "Seychelles," in Human Rights Report on Trafficking in Persons, Especially Women and Children, 2005, 1; available from http://www.protectionproject.org.

4238 UN Committee on the Rights of the Child, Consideration of Reports: Initial Reports: Seychelles, pg. 13.

4239 Ibid.

4240 U.S. Department of State, Country Reports – 2004: Seychelles, Section 6c.

4241 Ibid.

4242 U.S. Embassy Victoria, email communication to USDOL official, August 11, 2006.

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