Last Updated: Tuesday, 22 July 2014, 14:56 GMT

2007 Findings on the Worst Forms of Child Labor - Georgia

Publisher United States Department of Labor
Author Bureau of International Labor Affairs
Publication Date 27 August 2008
Cite as United States Department of Labor, 2007 Findings on the Worst Forms of Child Labor - Georgia, 27 August 2008, available at: http://www.refworld.org/docid/48caa47137.html [accessed 23 July 2014]
DisclaimerThis is not a UNHCR publication. UNHCR is not responsible for, nor does it necessarily endorse, its content. Any views expressed are solely those of the author or publisher and do not necessarily reflect those of UNHCR, the United Nations or its Member States.

Selected Statistics and Indicators on Child Labor1374
Working children, 5-14 years (%):
Working boys, 5-14 years (%):
Working girls, 5-14 years (%):
Working children by sector, 5-14 years (%):
     – Agriculture
     – Manufacturing
     – Services
     – Other
Minimum age for work:16
Compulsory education age:14
Free public education:Yes*
Gross primary enrollment rate (%), 2005:94
Net primary enrollment rate (%), 2005:87
School attendance, children 5-14 years (%):
Survival rate to grade 5 (%), 2004:79
ILO-IPEC participating country:Associated
* Must pay for school supplies and related items

Incidence and Nature of Child Labor

Children in Georgia work in the streets, begging or selling small items.1375 A 2007 study of street children by the NGO Save the Children indicates that the number of street children has significantly decreased compared with earlier estimates. The study found 700-800 children on the street in the entire country, with about half of them living in Tbilisi.1376 Prostitution of boys and girls is a problem; however, no statistics are available.1377 Trafficking of children rarely occurred, but street children and children living in orphanages were allegedly more vulnerable to the threat.1378

Child Labor Laws and Enforcement

The law sets the minimum age for work at 16 years.1379 However, children as young as 14 years may work with parental consent if the work does not damage the health of the minor or hinder their studies. Children between 16 and 18 years are permitted to work 36 hours per week, while children 14 to 16 years may work only 24 hours per week.1380 Children under 18 years are not permitted to work in heavy, harmful, or dangerous work, including underground work. Examples of harmful or dangerous work include mechanical engineering, metallurgy, and welding.1381 Employment of children under 18 years is prohibited between the hours of 10 p.m. and 6 a.m. and during holidays.1382 Minors are also banned from selling alcoholic beverages or tobacco; or magazines and newspapers containing pornographic materials; and from working in gambling institutions, night clubs, and bars.1383

Forced labor is prohibited in Georgia.1384 The law provides that sexual contact with any person under 16 years is a crime, and states that any person involving children under 18 years in prostitution or other sexual depravity may be punished with imprisonment up to 3 years.1385 The production, sale, distribution, or promotion of child pornography is punishable by a fine or by corrective labor or imprisonment of up to 3 years in length.. The punishment for involving a minor in the production of pornographic material is up to 5 years imprisonment.1386 The law prohibits trafficking in minors for sexual exploitation, forced labor, and other forms of exploitation. Punishment for these crimes is imprisonment from 8 years to life.1387 The minimum age for entry into the armed forces is 18 years.1388

The Ministry of Health and Social Security's Department for Social Protection is responsible for labor-related issues and employs two office employees and one labor inspector nationwide. It responds primarily to job-related accidents and has not received a child labor-related complaint since 2006.1389 The Permanent Anti-Trafficking Coordination Council is responsible for coordinating Government efforts against trafficking.1390 In 2007, 16 alleged traffickers were prosecuted, resulting in 13 convictions, and sentences ranging from 8 to 26 years imprisonment. At the end of 2007, the courts opened 24 new trafficking investigations, one involving a minor.1391

Current Government Policies and Programs to Eliminate the Worst Forms of Child Labor

The Government of Georgia continued to implement a National Plan of Action for Children (2003-2007), which included goals to assist street children and eliminate child labor and child sexual exploitation.1392 The Ministry of Health and Social Affairs continued to operate two trafficking shelters in Batumi and Tbilisi, which were opened in 2006 and 2007 respectively.1393

In July 2007, the Government of Georgia's Permanent Anti-Trafficking Coordination Council approved a strategy for rehabilitating and reintegrating trafficking victims into society.1394


1374 For statistical data not cited here, see the Data Sources and Definitions section. For data on ratifications and ILO-IPEC membership, see the Executive Summary. For minimum age for admission to work, age to which education is compulsory, and free public education, see U.S. Embassy – Tbilisi, reporting, December 6, 2007. See also U.S. Department of State, "Georgia," in Country Reports on Human Rights Practices – 2007, Washington, DC, March 11, 2008, section 5; available from http://www.state.gov/g/drl/rls/hrrpt/2007/100560.htm.

1375 Government of Georgia, National Plan of Action for Children 2003-2007 [Draft-English Edition], Tbilisi, 2003, 38.

1376 U.S. Embassy – Tbilisi, Email communication to USDOL Official, July 24, 2008.

1377 Government of Georgia, National Plan of Action for Children 2003-2007 [Draft-English Edition], 38 and 41.

1378 U.S. Department of State, "Country Reports – 2007: Georgia," section 5.

1379 Government of Georgia et al., Information on Child Labor Protection in Georgia, Tbilisi, February 2, 2005, 1. See also U.S. Embassy – Tbilisi, reporting, December 6, 2007.

1380 Government of Georgia, National Plan of Action for Children 2003-2007 [Draft-English Edition], 40.

1381 Government of Georgia et al., Information on Child Labor Protection, 2-3.

1382 U.S. Embassy – Tbilisi, reporting, December 6, 2007.

1383 Government of Georgia et al., Information on Child Labor Protection, 2-3.

1384 U.S. Department of State, "Country Reports – 2007: Georgia," section 6c.

1385 Government of Georgia, "Georgia," in Legislation of Interpol Member States on Sexual Offences Against Children-Georgia, 2006, accessed December 5, 2007; available from http://www.interpol.int/Public/Children/SexualAbuse/NationalLaws/csaGeorgia.asp.

1386 U.S. Embassy – Tbilisi, reporting, December 6, 2007. See also U.S. Embassy – Tbilisi, Email communication, July 24, 2008.

1387 U.S. Department of State, "Country Reports – 2007: Georgia," section 5.

1388 Coalition to Stop the Use of Child Soldiers, "Georgia," in Child Soldiers Global Report 2004, London, 2004; available from http://www.child-soldiers.org/document_get.php?id=901.

1389 U.S. Embassy – Tbilisi, reporting, December 6, 2007.

1390 U.S. Department of State, "Georgia (Tier 1 Watch List)," in Trafficking in Persons Report – 2007, Washington, DC, June 12, 2007; available from http://www.state.gov/g/tip/rls/tiprpt/2007/82805.htm.

1391 U.S. Department of State, "Country Reports – 2007: Georgia," section 5.

1392 Government of Georgia, National Plan of Action for Children 2003-2007 [Draft-English Edition].

1393 U.S. Department of State, "Country Reports – 2007: Georgia," section 5. See also U.S. Embassy – Tbilisi, Email communication, July 24, 2008.

1394 U.S. Department of State, "Trafficking in Persons Report – 2007: Georgia."

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