Last Updated: Thursday, 31 July 2014, 17:47 GMT

Philippines: Length of time a permanent resident can remain outside of the country before losing the right to return; whether it makes a difference if the person has an adult son living in the Philippines (May 2005)

Publisher Canada: Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada
Author Research Directorate, Immigration and Refugee Board, Canada
Publication Date 24 May 2005
Citation / Document Symbol PHL100065.E
Reference 2
Cite as Canada: Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada, Philippines: Length of time a permanent resident can remain outside of the country before losing the right to return; whether it makes a difference if the person has an adult son living in the Philippines (May 2005), 24 May 2005, PHL100065.E, available at: http://www.refworld.org/docid/42df616011.html [accessed 2 August 2014]
DisclaimerThis is not a UNHCR publication. UNHCR is not responsible for, nor does it necessarily endorse, its content. Any views expressed are solely those of the author or publisher and do not necessarily reflect those of UNHCR, the United Nations or its Member States.

In 16 May 2005 correspondence sent to the Research Directorate, the Consul General of the Embassy of the Philippines in Ottawa provided the following information:

Prior to departure from the Philippines, a legally admitted permanent resident should obtain a re-entry permit from the Philippine Bureau of Immigration, in which case he or she would not require a visa to return to the Philippines. Re-entry permits, which are valid for six months, can be extended for one year at the Commissioner of Immigration's discretion, up to a maximum continuous period of five years. Unless indicated otherwise, a re-entry permit is valid for a single trip.

The Consul General indicated that an expired re-entry permit cannot be extended. If a permanent resident who left the Philippines for a temporary visit abroad either does not possess a re-entry permit or possesses an expired re-entry permit, he or she may be granted a returning resident visa in order to return to the Philippines. The Consul General added, however, that in certain circumstances, a permanent resident can be assumed to have left the Philippines without any intention to return. Such circumstances could include: "failure to secure a re-entry permit prior to departure, absence of family ties in the Philippines, lack of ownership of substantial assets in the Philippines or non-engagement in a profitable profession in the Philippines."

More specific information on whether having an adult son, or any other immediate family members, living in the Philippines could affect a permanent resident's right to return to the Philippines could not be found among the sources consulted by the Research Directorate within time constraints.

This Response was prepared after researching publicly accessible information currently available to the Research Directorate within time constraints. This Response is not, and does not purport to be, conclusive as to the merit of any particular claim for refugee protection. Please find below the list of additional sources consulted in researching this Information Request.

Reference

Embassy of the Philippines in Ottawa. 16 May 2005. Correspondence from the Consul General.

Additional Sources Consulted

Internet sites, including: Amnesty International (AI), Embassy of the Philippines in Washington, DC, European Country of Origin Information Network (ECOI), Government of the Philippines, Human Rights Watch (HRW), Manila Times, Philippines Bureau of Immigration, Philstar.com, United States Department of State, World News Connection (WNC).

Copyright notice: This document is published with the permission of the copyright holder and producer Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada (IRB). The original version of this document may be found on the offical website of the IRB at http://www.irb-cisr.gc.ca/en/. Documents earlier than 2003 may be found only on Refworld.

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