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Bulgaria: Information on protection mechanisms for women suffering gender and human rights abuse, and whether there have been changes to the constitution to protect women

Publisher Canada: Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada
Author Research Directorate, Immigration and Refugee Board, Canada
Publication Date 1 January 1995
Citation / Document Symbol BGR19346.E
Cite as Canada: Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada, Bulgaria: Information on protection mechanisms for women suffering gender and human rights abuse, and whether there have been changes to the constitution to protect women, 1 January 1995, BGR19346.E, available at: http://www.refworld.org/docid/3ae6aadc2f.html [accessed 14 July 2014]
DisclaimerThis is not a UNHCR publication. UNHCR is not responsible for, nor does it necessarily endorse, its content. Any views expressed are solely those of the author or publisher and do not necessarily reflect those of UNHCR, the United Nations or its Member States.

 

In a telephone interview on 10 January 1995, a representative of the Women's Club Federation in Sofia provided the following information. There have been no changes to the constitution to protect women. The legal system is favourable to the protection of women, although there are no protection mechanisms pertaining specifically to women. Woman and men who seek protection through the legal system do so in an identical manner.

In a telephone interview on 6 January 1995, a representative of the Association of Bulgarian Lawyers for Human Rights in Sofia stated that there have been no amendments to the 1991 Constitution.

In a telephone interview on 6 January 1995, a representative of the Brussels-based European Women's Lobby, an umbrella group that lobbies the European Union on behalf of women, provided the following information. The representative had no knowledge of protection mechanisms available for women, but stated that the situation of abused women is very poor. The representative recently received a fax from a member of a women's organization in Sofia in which it was stated that the city administration in Sofia had passed a decree obligating abused women who go to women's shelters to give up their children to the state (ibid.).

For information on the protection mechanisms available for Roma women, and on their treatment by the police, please consult the attachments.

This response was prepared after researching publicly accessible information currently available to the DIRB within time constraints. This response is not, and does not purport to be, conclusive as to the merit of any particular claim to refugee status or asylum.

References

Association of Bulgarian Lawyers for Human Rights, Sofia. 6 January 1995. Telephone interview with representative.

European Women's Lobby, Brussels. 6 January 1995. Telephone interview with representative.

Women's Club Federation, Sofia. 10 January 1995. Telephone interview with representative.

Attachments

Amnesty International. 10 October 1994. "Bulgaria: Another Rom Dies in Custody in Suspicious Circumstances," pp. 1-2. (AI Index: EUR 15/WU 04/94). London: Amnesty International.

. September 1994. Bulgaria: Turning a Blind Eye to Racism, p. 1. (AI Index: EUR 15/04/94). London: Amnesty International.

. May 1993. Bulgaria: Torture and Ill-treatment of Roma, pp. 1-2. (AI Index: EUR 15/03/93). London: Amnesty International.

News From Helsinki Watch [New York]. November 1994. Vol. 6, No. 18. "Bulgaria: Increasing Violence Against Roma in Bulgaria," pp. 2-4, 15-18, 26-27.

. [New York]. 2 April 1993. Vol. 5, No. 5. "Bulgaria: Police Violence Against Gypsies," pp. 1-2, 4-5, 7-8.

Copyright notice: This document is published with the permission of the copyright holder and producer Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada (IRB). The original version of this document may be found on the offical website of the IRB at http://www.irb-cisr.gc.ca/en/. Documents earlier than 2003 may be found only on Refworld.

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