Last Updated: Thursday, 23 October 2014, 16:39 GMT

Honduras: Information on racism and treatment of ethnic Chinese

Publisher Canada: Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada
Author Research Directorate, Immigration and Refugee Board, Canada
Publication Date 1 June 1992
Citation / Document Symbol HND10765
Cite as Canada: Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada, Honduras: Information on racism and treatment of ethnic Chinese, 1 June 1992, HND10765, available at: http://www.refworld.org/docid/3ae6ad3818.html [accessed 23 October 2014]
DisclaimerThis is not a UNHCR publication. UNHCR is not responsible for, nor does it necessarily endorse, its content. Any views expressed are solely those of the author or publisher and do not necessarily reflect those of UNHCR, the United Nations or its Member States.

 

Information on a particular treatment faced by ethnic Chinese in Honduras could not be found among the sources currently available to the IRBDC.

A lawyer of the Honduran Committee for the Defense of Human Rights (CODEH) stated that the ethnic Chinese community in Honduras is rather small (4 June 1992). Many of the ethnic Chinese are immigrants who arrived from China after the Maoist revolution and their descendants, although at present the Honduran government is providing certain facilities for Chinese wishing to immigrate to Honduras (Ibid.). The Chinese community has established itself in Honduran society, mostly in the field of restaurants and small businesses (such as corner stores), although there are an increasing number of ethnic Chinese working in professional fields such as engineering (Ibid.). The source indicated that CODEH is not aware of any particular abuses or human rights violations suffered by the Chinese community as a whole, although the possibility of individuals suffering abuses cannot be dismissed, and the influence their particular ethnicity may have in such a case cannot be gauged in a general statement. The source added that many abuses or adversities suffered by particular ethnic groups in Honduras, such as land expropriation, are of more of a cultural and economic nature, rather than racial, however ethnically distinct the parties involved may be (Ibid.).

The attached documents provide information on the situation of the most significant ethnic groups of Honduras, including blacks, Indians and Arabs or Lebanese who are generally referred to as "Turks" (Barry & Norsworthy 1990, 95).

Additional and/or corroborating information could not be found among the sources currently available to the IRBDC.

References

Barry, Tom and Ken Norsworthy. 1990. Honduras: A Country Guide. New Mexico: The Inter-Hemispheric Education Resource Center.

Honduran Committee for the Defense of Human Rights (CODEH), Tegucigalpa. 4 June 1992. Telephone Interview with Lawyer.

Attachments

Barry, Tom and Ken Norsworthy. 1990. Honduras: A Country Guide. New Mexico: The Inter-Hemispheric Education Resource Center, pp. 94-98.

George Thomas Kurian. Encyclopedia of the Third World. 1987. Vol. 2. New York: Facts on File, Inc., p. 849.

Rudolph, James D., ed. 1983. Honduras: A Country Study. Washington, D.C.: The American University Foreign Area Studies, pp. 68-75, 88-99.

Copyright notice: This document is published with the permission of the copyright holder and producer Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada (IRB). The original version of this document may be found on the offical website of the IRB at http://www.irb-cisr.gc.ca/en/. Documents earlier than 2003 may be found only on Refworld.

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