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Policies of apartheid of the Government of South Africa A International efforts to eradicate apartheid

Publisher UN General Assembly
Author UN General Assembly
Publication Date 19 December 1990
Citation / Document Symbol A/RES/45/176
Reference 70th plenary meeting
Cite as UN General Assembly, Policies of apartheid of the Government of South Africa A International efforts to eradicate apartheid , 19 December 1990, A/RES/45/176, available at: http://www.refworld.org/docid/3b00f18a10.html [accessed 31 October 2014]
 

Policies of apartheid of the Government of South Africa

A

International efforts to eradicate apartheid

 

The General Assembly,

Reaffirming the Declaration on Apartheid and its Destructive Consequences in Southern Africa, contained in the annex to its resolution S-16/1 of 14 December 1989, and its resolution 44/244 of 17 September 1990,

Having considered the report of the Special Committee against Apartheid, and the report of the Secretary-General on progress made in the implementation of the Declaration,

Convinced that the total eradication of apartheid and the establishment, through broad-based negotiations, of a non-racial democracy based on a new constitutional order providing for universal, equal suffrage under a non-racial voters' roll can lead to a peaceful and lasting solution to the problems facing the people of South Africa,

Also convinced that the policy and practice of apartheid breeds violence and its continuation would be detrimental to the vital interests of all the people of South Africa,

Gravely concerned at the continuing repression of the majority population in South Africa through the apartheid system, manifested, inter alia, by detentions without trial, continued possibility of executions of political prisoners, absence of full implementation of agreements regarding the return of political exiles without restrictions and repressive provisions in the Internal Security Act,

Noting that, while some significant measures in the right direction have been undertaken by the South African authorities, including the recent repeal of the Separate Amenities Act and the lifting of the state of emergency throughout the country, continuing effort is needed to facilitate free political activity and to foster a climate fully conducive to negotiations,

Welcoming the ongoing talks between the African National Congress of South Africa and the South African authorities aimed at facilitating the commencement of substantive broad-based negotiations,

Noting that the African National Congress, in an effort to contribute to an atmosphere free of violence, which is in accordance with the guidelines of the Declaration, and further to the agreements set out in the Pretoria Minute of 6 August 1990, has suspended its armed activities,

Gravely concerned that the recurring violence resulting largely from the persistence of apartheid and other factors, including actions of those opposed to the democratic transformation of South Africa, poses a threat to the negotiating process,

Noting with serious concern the continuing effects of the acts of aggression and destabilization that have been committed by South Africa against neighbouring independent African States, in particular against Angola and Mozambique,

Noting that the international community has generally adhered to the programme of action contained in the Declaration, and expressing its concern over any departures that have occurred from the international consensus reflected in the Declaration,

Recognizing the responsibility of the United Nations and the international community to take all necessary measures aimed at the eradication of apartheid through peaceful means, in particular by adhering to the programme of action contained in the Declaration by maintaining the measures aimed at encouraging the South African authorities to eradicate apartheid and to promote profound and irreversible change,

1. Reaffirms its support for the legitimate struggle of the South African people for the total eradication of apartheid and the establishment of a united, non-racial and democratic society in South Africa in which all its people, irrespective of race, colour, sex or creed, will enjoy the same fundamental freedoms and human rights;

2. Takes note of Pretoria's declared commitment to abolish the apartheid system;

3. Reaffirms the provisions of the Declaration on Apartheid and its Destructive Consequences in Southern Africa and the need for their full and immediate implementation;

4. Fully supports the efforts of the South African people to arrive at a peaceful settlement of the problems in their country through genuine negotiations, and welcomes the fact that the African National Congress of South Africa and the South African regime have engaged in talks that have thus far resulted in the agreements set out in the Groote Schuur Minute of 4 May 1990 and in the Pretoria Minute, aimed at facilitating the commencement of substantive negotiations;

5. Calls upon the South African authorities to continue their efforts to foster a climate fully conducive to negotiations and free political activity, in particular by repealing all repressive legislation, such as provisions in the Internal Security Act, by ending detentions without trial, by allowing the return of all political exiles without restrictions and by fully implementing all agreements reached so far with the African National Congress, including the release of all remaining political prisoners;

6. Calls for a speedy and full implementation of the agreements reached so far between the South African regime and the African National Congress;

7. Welcomes the progress made thus far aimed at facilitating the commencement of substantive broad-based negotiations and encourages all parties concerned, taking into account the guidelines to the process of negotiations contained in the Declaration, to participate fully in future negotiations, in order to secure the adoption of a new constitution and the establishment of a united, non-racial and democratic South Africa;

8. Calls for an immediate end to violence, which has resulted largely from the continued existence of the apartheid policies, practices and structures;

9. Calls upon the South African authorities to redouble their efforts to end recurring violence by ensuring effective and impartial actions by all branches of government and all competent authorities against all those responsible for violence, including vigilante groups, and calls upon all parties concerned to contribute to the establishment of an atmosphere free of violence;

10. Considers that while the South African authorities have declared their intention to eradicate apartheid and embark on negotiations for a new constitution, the process of change in South Africa remains at an early stage and further substantive progress needs to be made to promote the profound and irreversible changes called for in the Declaration;

11. Calls upon all Governments and intergovernmental organizations to adhere strictly to the programme of action contained in the Declaration by maintaining the measures aimed at applying pressure on the South African regime to eradicate apartheid and to promote profound and irreversible changes, bearing in mind the objectives of the Declaration, namely, the speedy eradication of apartheid and the establishment of a united, democratic, non-racial South Africa;

12. Calls upon all Governments, intergovernmental organizations and financial institutions to use concerted and effective measures, particularly in the areas of economic and financial relations with apartheid South Africa, aimed at applying pressure to ensure a speedy end to apartheid;

13. Calls upon all Governments to observe fully the mandatory arms embargo and requests the Security Council to monitor effectively the strict implementation of the arms embargo;

14. Appeals to all Governments and organizations to render all possible assistance to the front-line States, particularly Angola and Mozambique, to enable them to reconstruct their economies, which have been devastated from years of destabilization;

15. Appeals to all States, organizations and institutions to increase economic, humanitarian, legal, educational and other assistance and support to the victims of apartheid and to all those, including previously banned organizations, who oppose apartheid and promote a united, non-racial, democratic society in South Africa;

16. Urges the international community and the Secretary-General, through the relevant United Nations agencies, to provide all possible assistance to facilitate the re-establishment of previously banned political organizations in South Africa as well as the reintegration of released political prisoners and returning South African refugees and exiles;

17. Requests the Secretary-General to ensure the co-ordination of activities of the United Nations system in the implementation of the Declaration and report thereon to the General Assembly at its forty-sixth session, and to continue monitoring the implementation of the Declaration as well as pursuing appropriate initiatives to facilitate all efforts leading to the peaceful eradication of apartheid.

B

Concerted and effective measures aimed at eradicating apartheid

 

The General Assembly,

Recalling the Declaration on Apartheid and its Destructive Consequences in Southern Africa, adopted by consensus on 14 December 1989 at its sixteenth special session, and its resolution 44/244 of 17 September 1990,

Recalling also its resolution 44/27 K of 22 November 1989 and other relevant resolutions,

Taking note of the report of the Special Committee against Apartheid and of the reports of the Secretary-General on international financial pressure on the apartheid economy of South Africa and measures to monitor sanctions undertaken by the United Nations system, Governments and non-governmental agencies,

Gravely concerned that, in spite of recent positive developments in South Africa, the system of apartheid and most of its main pillars, namely, the Land Acts, the Group Areas Act, the Population Registration Act, the Bantu Education Act and the acts establishing the tricameral Parliament and the bantustan system, still remain intact,

Convinced that sanctions and other restrictive measures have had a significant impact on recent developments in South Africa and remain a most effective and necessary instrument of pressure towards the peaceful resolution of the conflict in that country,

Strongly convinced that the imposition of comprehensive and mandatory sanctions by the Security Council under Chapter VII of the Charter of the United Nations remains the most appropriate and effective means to bring about a peaceful end to apartheid,

Noting that the States Members of the United Nations and the members of the international community have generally adhered to the programme of action contained in the Declaration and expressing its concern over any departures that have occurred from the international consensus reflected in the Declaration,

Gravely concerned that some Member States and transnational corporations have continued economic relations with South Africa, while others continue to undermine the sanctions imposed by other States, by establishing and/or increasing their trade with that country, as borne out in the report of the Special Committee,

Noting with concern that sanctions and other measures adopted by the General Assembly, as well as measures introduced unilaterally by a number of States, lack co-ordination, monitoring and enforcement mechanisms,

Considering that measures taken by States individually or collectively, while commendable, vary in coverage and degree of monitoring and enforcement, and are not always addressed to those areas of the South African economy which are responsive to international pressures,

Noting with concern the recent talks between the International Monetary Fund and representatives of the South African regime and any consideration by the Fund of loans to South Africa,

Commending those States which have not relaxed their existing measures and maintained their commitment to the international consensus expressed in the programme of action contained in the Declaration, whereby Member States of the United Nations decided that the international community should not relax existing measures,

1. Reaffirms that apartheid is a crime against the conscience and dignity of humankind and a threat to international peace and security, and that it is a primary responsibility of the United Nations to assist in efforts to eliminate it without further delay;

2. Calls upon all States, especially those States which have increased or initiated trade, financial and other links with South Africa, in particular the leading trading partners of South Africa, as indicated in the annual report of the Special Committee against Apartheid, to adhere fully to the programme of action contained in the Declaration on Apartheid and its Destructive Consequences in Southern Africa;

3. Calls upon all States to maintain existing measures aimed at applying pressure on apartheid South Africa, particularly in the following areas:

(a) Supply of all products, in particular computer and communications equipment, technologies, skills and services, including military intelligence, that can be used for the military and nuclear industry of South Africa;

(b) Import of coal, gold and other minerals and agricultural products from South Africa;

(c) Effective withdrawal of transnational corporations, banks and financial institutions from South Africa by ceasing equity investment and by cutting off non-equity links, particularly those involving transfer of high technology and know-how;

(d) Provision of new credits and loans;

(e) Double taxation agreements with South Africa and any form of tax relief in respect of income from investments in that country;

(f) Landing and port rights to South African air and sea carriers and direct air, sea and other transport links with South Africa;

4. Appeals to all Governments, organizations and individuals to refrain from any sports relations with South Africa and not entertain any cultural or academic links unless any particular activity in the cultural and academic fields has the intent and effect of opposing apartheid in line with United Nations policy on this matter, and to give appropriate assistance in these fields to the anti-apartheid forces and to the disadvantaged sections of South African society;

5. Urges Governments and private financial institutions, as well as the International Monetary Fund and the World Bank, not to extend loans and credits to South Africa, whether to the public or private sector, until there is clear evidence of profound and irreversible changes in South Africa, bearing in mind the objectives of the Declaration;

6. Urges all States to close existing loopholes in their existing measures, monitor strictly their implementation and adopt and apply, when necessary, legislation providing for penalties on individuals and enterprises violating those measures;

7. Requests the Special Committee to continue to monitor the implementation of existing measures aimed at the eradication of apartheid, and to report thereon to the General Assembly and the Security Council as appropriate;

8. Requests the Secretary-General to report to the General Assembly at its forty-sixth session on the implementation of the present resolution.

C

Military collaboration with South Africa

 

The General Assembly,

Recalling the Declaration on Apartheid and its Destructive Consequences in Southern Africa, adopted by consensus on 14 December 1989 at its sixteenth special session, and its resolution 44/244 of 17 September 1990,

Recalling its resolutions and those of the Security Council on the arms embargo, as well as other resolutions on collaboration with South Africa,

Taking note of the report of the Special Committee against Apartheid and the report of the Security Council Committee established by Council resolution 421 (1977) of 9 December 1977 concerning the question of South Africa on its activities during the period 1980-1989,

Noting with grave concern that the mandatory sanctions imposed by the Security Council in its resolution 418 (1977) of 4 November 1977 lack an effective monitoring and enforcement mechanism,

Noting with appreciation the resolve and coerciveness of the Security Council in its handling of questions relating to the preservation of international peace and security,

Reiterating that the full implementation of the arms embargo against South Africa is an essential element of international action against apartheid,

Expressing serious concern at the increasing number of violations of the mandatory arms embargo, particularly by those countries which surreptitiously continue to trade in arms with South Africa and allow South Africa to participate in international arms exhibitions,

Gravely concerned at the practice carried out by certain oil-producing States whereby oil is exchanged for South African arms,

Noting with concern that South Africa's external military relations, especially in the area of military technology and, in particular, in the production and testing of nuclear missiles, continue unabated,

1. Strongly deplores the actions of those States which, directly or indirectly, continue to violate the arms embargo and collaborate with South Africa in the military, nuclear, intelligence and technology fields, and calls upon those States to terminate forthwith such hostile acts and honour their obligations under Security Council resolution 421 (1977);

2. Urges all States to adopt strict legislation relating to the implementation of the arms embargo and prohibit the supply to South Africa of all products, in particular computer and communications equipment, technologies, skills and services, including military intelligence, that can be used for the military and nuclear industry of that country;

3. Urges the Security Council to consider immediate steps to ensure the scrupulous and full implementation and the effective monitoring of the arms embargo imposed by Council resolutions 418 (1977) and 558 (1984) of 13 December 1984, to consider strengthening the monitoring and the reporting of violations of the arms embargo and to provide information on a regular basis to the Secretary-General for general distribution to Member States;

4. Also urges the Security Council to implement the recommendations of the report of the Committee established under Council resolution 421 (1977) concerning appropriate measures against those States violating the mandatory arms embargo against South Africa;

5. Requests the Special Committee against Apartheid to keep the matter under constant review and to report thereon to the General Assembly and the Security Council as appropriate.

D

Relations between South Africa and Israel

 

The General Assembly,

Recalling its previous resolutions concerning the relations between South Africa and Israel and, in particular, its resolution 44/27 F of 22 November 1989,

Having considered the report of the Special Committee against Apartheid on recent developments concerning relations between South Africa and Israel, and the report of the Secretary-General on South Africa's nuclear-tipped ballistic missile capability,

Noting with concern that the military relations between South Africa and Israel, especially in the area of military technology and in particular the collaboration in the recent production and testing of nuclear missiles, continue unabated,

1. Condemns the collaboration of Israel with the South African regime in the military and nuclear fields;

2. Reiterates its demand that Israel desist from and terminate forthwith all forms of collaboration with South Africa, particularly in the military and nuclear fields;

3. Urges the Security Council to take appropriate measures against Israel for its violation of the mandatory arms embargo against South Africa;

4. Requests the Special Committee against Apartheid to continue to monitor the relations between South Africa and Israel and keep them under constant review and report to the General Assembly and the Security Council as appropriate.

E

Programme of work of the Special Committee against Apartheid

 

The General Assembly,

Having considered the report of the Special Committee against Apartheid,

1. Commends the Special Committee against Apartheid for the diligent manner in which it has discharged its responsibilities in monitoring the situation in South Africa and promoting international action against apartheid;

2. Takes note of the report of the Special Committee and endorses its recommendations relating to its programme of work;

3. Authorizes the Special Committee, in accordance with its mandate and acting, with the support services of the United Nations Centre against Apartheid, as the focal point for the international campaign against apartheid and the promotion of the implementation of the Declaration on Apartheid and its Destructive Consequences in Southern Africa:

(a) To continue monitoring closely developments in South Africa and the actions of the international community, particularly regarding the need for maintaining pressure on South Africa as called for in the Declaration;

(b) To continue mobilizing international action against apartheid, inter alia, through collection, analysis and dissemination of information, through liaison and consultations with Governments, intergovernmental and non-governmental organizations and relevant individuals and groups, both inside and outside South Africa, able to influence public opinion and decision-making, and through missions, hearings, conferences, publicity and other relevant activities;

(c) To publish an interim annual report during the first half of 1991 on developments in South Africa and on the international response thereto and, in this context, undertake, as appropriate, consultations with the parties concerned;

4. Appeals to all Governments, intergovernmental and non-governmental organizations to increase their co-operation with the Special Committee and the Centre in the discharge of their mandates;

5. Requests all United Nations bodies, organs and agencies to co-operate with the Special Committee and the Centre in their activities in order to ensure consistency, improve co-ordination and efficient use of available resources and avoid duplication of efforts in the implementation of the relevant resolutions of the General Assembly and the Security Council;

6. Requests Governments and organizations to provide financial and other assistance for the special projects of the Special Committee and to make generous contributions to the Trust Fund for Publicity against Apartheid;

7. Appeals to all Governments, intergovernmental and non-governmental organizations, information media and individuals to co-operate with the Centre and the Department of Public Information of the Secretariat in their activities relating to apartheid and, in particular, in disseminating information on the evolving situation in South Africa;

8. Decides to continue the authorization of adequate financial provision in the regular budget of the United Nations to enable the African National Congress of South Africa and the Pan Africanist Congress of Azania to maintain offices in New York in order to participate effectively in the deliberations of the Special Committee and other appropriate bodies;

9. Decides to make a special allocation of 480,000 United States dollars to the Special Committee for 1991 from the regular budget of the United Nations to cover the cost of special projects to be decided upon by the Committee.

F

Oil embargo against South Africa

 

The General Assembly,

Having considered the report of the Intergovernmental Group to Monitor the Supply and Shipping of Oil and Petroleum Products to South Africa, as well as its interim report, which was adopted unanimously on 12 June 1990,

Recalling its resolution 44/244 of 17 September 1990, in which it reaffirmed the Declaration on Apartheid and its Destructive Consequences in Southern Africa, which was adopted by consensus on 14 December 1989 by the General Assembly at its sixteenth special session,

Recalling also its resolutions on the oil embargo against South Africa, in particular resolution 44/27 H of 22 November 1989,

Recognizing the importance of the oil embargo and other existing measures imposed by the international community on the apartheid regime towards the elimination of apartheid through negotiations, as well as the importance of maintaining these measures until there is clear evidence of profound and irreversible changes, bearing in mind the objectives of the Declaration,

Noting that, while oil-exporting States have committed themselves to an oil embargo against South Africa, very few major shipping States have done so,

Concerned that the oil embargo against South Africa is still being violated and that South Africa, because of loopholes in the embargo, such as lack of effective legislation, has been able to acquire oil and petroleum products,

Convinced that an effective oil embargo against South Africa would contribute to the efforts of the international community to bring about a negotiated settlement and the establishment of a united, non-racial and democratic South Africa,

1. Takes note of the report of the Intergovernmental Group to Monitor the Supply and Shipping of Oil and Petroleum Products to South Africa and endorses its recommendations;

2. Commends the proposed model law for the effective enforcement of the oil embargo against South Africa annexed to the annual report of the Intergovernmental Group to States for their attention, including consideration of the adoption of the general principles of the draft within the context and framework of their own legal practices;

3. Urges the Security Council to take action under appropriate provisions of the Charter of the United Nations to ensure an effective embargo on the supply and shipping of oil and petroleum products to South Africa in order to effect a speedy and peaceful eradication of apartheid;

4. Requests all States, pending such decisions, to adopt effective measures and/or legislation to broaden the scope of the oil embargo in order to ensure the complete cessation of the supply and shipping of oil and petroleum products to South Africa, whether directly or indirectly, and in particular:

(a) To apply strictly the "end users" clause and other conditions concerning restriction on destination to ensure compliance with the embargo;

(b) To compel the companies originally selling or purchasing oil or petroleum products, as appropriate to each nation, to desist from selling, reselling or otherwise transferring oil and petroleum products to South Africa, whether directly or indirectly;

(c) To establish strict control over the supply of oil and petroleum products to South Africa by intermediaries, oil companies and traders by placing responsibility for the fulfilment of the contract on the first buyer or seller of oil and petroleum products who would, therefore, be liable for the actions of these parties;

(d) To prevent access by South Africa to other sources of energy, including the supply of raw materials, technical know-how, financial assistance and transport;

(e) To prohibit all assistance to apartheid South Africa, including the provision of finance, technology, equipment or personnel for the prospecting, development or production of hydrocarbon resources, the construction or operation of oil-from-coal or oil-from-gas plants or the development and operation of plants producing fuel substitutes and additives such as ethanol and methanol;

(f) To prevent South African corporations from maintaining or expanding their holdings in oil companies or properties outside South Africa;

(g) To terminate the transport of oil and petroleum products to South Africa by ships flying their flags, or by ships that are ultimately owned, managed or chartered by their nationals or by companies within their jurisdiction;

(h) To develop a system for registration of ships, registered or owned by their nationals, that have unloaded oil or petroleum products in South Africa in contravention of embargoes imposed, and to discourage such ships from calling at South African ports;

(i) To impose penal action against companies and individuals that have been involved in violating the oil embargo, and to publicize cases of successful prosecutions in conformity with their national laws;

(j) To gather, exchange and disseminate information regarding violations of the oil embargo, including ways and means to prevent such violations, and to take concerted measures against violators;

(k) To discourage ships capable of carrying oil or petroleum products in their national registries or owned or managed by companies or individuals within their jurisdiction from engaging in activities that give rise to violation of the oil embargo against South Africa, taking into account legislative and other measures already adopted;

5. Authorizes the Intergovernmental Group to take action to promote public awareness of the oil embargo against South Africa, including, when necessary, sending missions and participating in relevant conferences and meetings;

6. Requests the Intergovernmental Group to submit to the General Assembly at its forty-sixth session a report on the implementation of the present resolution;

7. Requests all States to extend their co-operation to the Intergovernmental Group in the implementation of the present resolution, including submission of proposals for strengthening the mechanism to monitor the supply and shipment of oil and petroleum products to South Africa;

8. Requests the Secretary-General to provide the Intergovernmental Group with all necessary assistance for the implementation of the present resolution.

G

Support for the work of the Commission against Apartheid in Sports

 

The General Assembly,

Recalling its resolutions on the boycott of apartheid in sports and in particular resolution 32/105 M of 14 December 1977 by which it adopted the International Declaration against Apartheid in Sports, resolution 40/64 G of 10 December 1985, the annex to which contains the International Convention against Apartheid in Sports, and resolution 44/27 L of 22 November 1989,

Having considered the report of the Commission against Apartheid in Sports and the relevant sections of the report of the Special Committee against Apartheid,

Reiterating that the sports boycott of South Africa should be maintained until profound and irreversible changes aimed at the total eradication of apartheid take place in that country,

1. Takes note of the report of the Commission against Apartheid in Sports;

2. Calls upon the States that have signed the International Convention against Apartheid in Sports to ratify it and also calls upon other States to accede to it as soon as possible;

3. Commends those Governments, organizations and individual sportsmen and sportswomen who have taken action in accordance with the Register of Sports Contacts with South Africa with a view to achieving the total isolation of apartheid in sports;

4. Requests the Special Committee against Apartheid to continue issuing the Register of Sports Contacts with South Africa;

5. Calls upon those international sports organizations and federations which have not yet expelled South Africa or suspended its membership to do so without further delay;

6. Calls upon all Governments and sports organizations to maintain the sports boycott of South Africa until profound and irreversible changes take place in that country;

7. Urges Governments and the international sporting community to assist the non-racial sports movement in South Africa to redress the structural inequalities created and sustained by the apartheid State;

8. Requests the Secretary-General to provide the Commission against Apartheid in Sports with all needed assistance.

H

United Nations Trust Fund for South Africa

 

The General Assembly,

Recalling its resolutions on the United Nations Trust Fund for South Africa, in particular resolution 44/27 J of 22 November 1989,

Having considered the report of the Secretary-General on the United Nations Trust Fund for South Africa, to which is annexed the report of the Committee of Trustees of the Trust Fund,

Taking note of resolution 44/244 adopted by consensus by the General Assembly on 17 September 1990, and in particular of its paragraph 8 relating to the reintegration of released political prisoners into the South African society,

Welcoming the release of Nelson Mandela and some other political prisoners, the suspension of executions and the unbanning of a number of political organizations, including the African National Congress of South Africa and the Pan Africanist Congress of Azania, and the lifting of the nation-wide state of emergency and the repeal of certain emergency regulations,

Remaining seriously concerned by the continued existence of basic laws sustaining the apartheid system and other discriminatory and repressive laws, rules and regulations in South Africa,

Concerned by the large number of political trials in 1990 and the continued application of criminal proceedings to cases that are clearly of a political nature,

Reaffirming that continued humanitarian and legal assistance by the international community is necessary to alleviate the plight of those persecuted under repressive and discriminatory legislation in South Africa and to facilitate the reintegration of released political prisoners,

Strongly convinced that continued contributions to the Trust Fund and to the voluntary agencies concerned are necessary to enable them to meet the extensive needs for humanitarian, legal and relief assistance in this crucial period,

1. Endorses the report of the Secretary-General on the United Nations Trust Fund for South Africa;

2. Decides, in view of the independence of Namibia, to delete paragraph (e) of the terms of reference of the Trust Fund;

3. Expresses its appreciation to the Governments, organizations and individuals that have contributed to the Trust Fund and to the voluntary agencies engaged in rendering humanitarian and legal assistance to the victims of apartheid and racial discrimination in South Africa;

4. Appeals for generous contributions to the Trust Fund;

5. Also appeals for direct contributions to the voluntary agencies engaged in rendering assistance to the victims of apartheid and racial discrimination in South Africa;

6. Commends the Secretary-General and the Committee of Trustees of the Trust Fund for their persistent efforts to promote humanitarian and legal assistance to persons persecuted under repressive and discriminatory legislation in South Africa, as well as assistance to their families and to refugees from South Africa.

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