Last Updated: Thursday, 18 September 2014, 13:28 GMT

Reporters Without Borders Annual Report 2004 - Cape Verde

Publisher Reporters Without Borders
Publication Date 2004
Cite as Reporters Without Borders, Reporters Without Borders Annual Report 2004 - Cape Verde, 2004, available at: http://www.refworld.org/docid/46e691062.html [accessed 19 September 2014]
DisclaimerThis is not a UNHCR publication. UNHCR is not responsible for, nor does it necessarily endorse, its content. Any views expressed are solely those of the author or publisher and do not necessarily reflect those of UNHCR, the United Nations or its Member States.

The government maintained its pressure on the state-owned media, which did not have complete editorial freedom. But the privately-owned press encountered no particular obstacle.

Only one real press freedom violation was registered in 2003. José Carlos Semedo, a journalist with the state-owned broadcaster RTC, was suspended at the start of August for two months along with a producer and an editor because two guests on the "Press Club" programme accused RTC's management of waste while the rest of the corporation was starved of resources and equipment. "Press Club" was dropped.

In another case, two journalists received court summonses at the end of the year for allegedly libelling a former minister when they accused him of physically attacking a fellow journalist in February 2002. The libel suit could come to trial in 2004.

But on the whole, freedom of expression was in good shape in Cape Verde. Several commercial radio stations were founded in 2003 and the online press continued to expand and become an important way of reaching the sizable Cape Verdean diaspora.

The country is also becoming more and more aware of the importance of the role the press plays. The Association of Journalists of Cape Verde (AJOC) held its first general assembly in five years while the government announced in September that a new communication law was being prepared. It was expected to deal with the assignment of press cards and the way the state-owned media operate.

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