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Venezuela: Information on a religious para-military group called "Family, Tradition and Property" (TFP), its mandate, the name of its founder, whether any training was required to join the sect, whether this organization was banned by the government and, if so, when (1984-1985)

Publisher Canada: Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada
Author Research Directorate, Immigration and Refugee Board, Canada
Publication Date 1 April 1998
Citation / Document Symbol VEN29055.E
Cite as Canada: Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada, Venezuela: Information on a religious para-military group called "Family, Tradition and Property" (TFP), its mandate, the name of its founder, whether any training was required to join the sect, whether this organization was banned by the government and, if so, when (1984-1985), 1 April 1998, VEN29055.E, available at: http://www.refworld.org/docid/3ae6abee60.html [accessed 21 August 2014]
DisclaimerThis is not a UNHCR publication. UNHCR is not responsible for, nor does it necessarily endorse, its content. Any views expressed are solely those of the author or publisher and do not necessarily reflect those of UNHCR, the United Nations or its Member States.

 

For information on a religious para-military group called "Family, Tradition and Property" (TFP), its mandate, the name of its founder and on whether any training was required to join the group, please consult the attached articles.

In November 1984, Reuters reported that the government of President Jaime Lusinchi intended to formally announce a ban on the movement "after a three-month investigation showed it was acting outside the Constitution" (13 Nov. 1984). The investigation followed several parents' complaints "that the group had brainwashed their teenage children and alienated them from their families" (ibid.).

An October 1984 Latin America Weekly Report defined Tradición, Familia y Propriedad (TFP) as "an ultramontane Catholic group, strongest in Brazil and Argentina, which among other things maintains that all Popes since John XXIII have come under Marxist influence"

(19 Oct. 1984). The article also reported that "...suspected of preparing an assassination attempt against Pope John Paul II, their headquarters in the Caracas Country Club have been raided" (ibid.). Caracas and Valencia are two Venezuelan cities where the group was active (ibid.). 

In 1981, The Washington Post stated that TFP targets included "the human rights policy of former president Carter, pornography, rent control, Catholic masses in Portuguese and the theology of liberation, a Latin American intellectual movement wedding Catholic doctrine and revolutionary social action" (22 Dec. 1981).

In a 1986 article, The Washington Post described TFP as an "all-male, extreme right-wing group with chapters in 13 countries" (15 May 1986). The Brazil-based organization was financed mainly by wealthy South American families and supported the Pinochet dictatorship in Chile (ibid.). It was banned for its paramilitary activities in Venezuela, where it was implicated in 1984 in a plot to assassinate the Pope, a charge that the group denied (ibid.).

This Response was prepared after researching publicly accessible information currently available to the Research Directorate within time constraints. This Response is not, and does not purport to be, conclusive as to the merit of any particular claim to refugee status or asylum.

References

Latin America Weekly Report [London]. 19 October 1984. "Venezuela/Right-Wing Organisation." (NEXIS)

Reuters. 13 November 1984. AM Cycle. "The Venezuelan government plans..." (NEXIS)

The Washington Post [Washington, DC]. 15 May 1986. Final Edition. Paul Attanasio. "The Hail on 'Hail Mary'; Furor Over Godard's Modern Nativity Story." (NEXIS)

_____. 22 December 1981. Final Edition. Jim Brooke. "Brazilian Raises His Medieval Banner In Anti-Mitterand Propaganda Battle." (NEXIS)

Attachments

The San Diego Union-Tribune. 22 February 1985. Merrill Collett. "Sect Suffers After Alleged Plot on Pope." (NEXIS)

United Press International (UPI). 14 December 1984. PM Cycle. "Police Uncover Plot to Kill Pope." (NEXIS)

Additional Sources Consulted

Antisemitism World Report. Yearly. (1993-95). London: The Institute of Jewish Affairs.

Contemporary Religions: A World Guide. 1992. Edited by Ian Harris et al. London: Longman Group.

Encyclopedia of Islam. 1990. Leiden: Brill.

The Encyclopedia of Religion. 1987. Edited by Mircea Eliade. New York: MacMillan Publishing Company.

L'état des religions. 1987. Paris: La découverte.

Le grand atlas universalis des religions. 1988. Paris: Universalis.

Les grandes dates de l'Islam. 1990. Paris: Larousse.

Human Rights and the World's Religions. 1988. Indiana: University of Notre Dame Press.

Index on Censorship [London].1984-1985.

Latin America Regional Reports [London]: Andean Group Reports. 1985.

Religion in Third World Politics. 1994. Jeff Haynes. Boulder: Lynn Reinner Publishers.

Electronic Sources: IRB Databases, Global News Bank, Lexis/Nexis, Internet, REFWORLD, World News Connection (WNC).

Copyright notice: This document is published with the permission of the copyright holder and producer Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada (IRB). The original version of this document may be found on the offical website of the IRB at http://www.irb-cisr.gc.ca/en/. Documents earlier than 2003 may be found only on Refworld.

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