Last Updated: Wednesday, 30 July 2014, 09:43 GMT

Tanzania: Information on the colour of the outside cover of the Tanzania passport; on whether the passport includes a photograph of the bearer and the bearer's family; and on the maximum age children may travel on a parent's passport before requiring their own

Publisher Canada: Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada
Author Research Directorate, Immigration and Refugee Board, Canada
Publication Date 1 May 1995
Citation / Document Symbol TZA20435.E
Cite as Canada: Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada, Tanzania: Information on the colour of the outside cover of the Tanzania passport; on whether the passport includes a photograph of the bearer and the bearer's family; and on the maximum age children may travel on a parent's passport before requiring their own, 1 May 1995, TZA20435.E, available at: http://www.refworld.org/docid/3ae6ab4a20.html [accessed 30 July 2014]
DisclaimerThis is not a UNHCR publication. UNHCR is not responsible for, nor does it necessarily endorse, its content. Any views expressed are solely those of the author or publisher and do not necessarily reflect those of UNHCR, the United Nations or its Member States.

 

The following information was provided in a telephone interview by an official at the High Commission for the United Republic of Tanzania in Ottawa (2 May 1995).

The Tanzanian passport is now a computer-readable document with the same dimensions as a Canadian passport. It is issued in three types: ordinary, diplomatic and service. A service passport is issued to senior public servants for official travel abroad. The outside cover of an ordinary passport is green and the cover features the national emblem with the word "Tanzania" printed below. Diplomatic passports are black and include the word diplomatic on the cover. Service passports are of the same design, except that they are blue.

A photograph of the bearer appears on page three of the passport. Photographs of other family members do not appear in the passport, but the names of any children are listed, usually on page six. Children's names can appear in either the mother's or the father's, or in both parents' passports.

Children are required to obtain their own passport at the age of sixteen. However, in exceptional cases, such as children attending foreign schools or orphans, for example, passports may be issued to students under the age of sixteen.

According to Passport Handbook to Check the Authenticity of Passports, the non-computer-readable Tanzanian passports were green in colour with two white oval cut-outs (1987, T2). One cut-out was above the words "Pasi Passport" and displayed the passport number, while the other cut-out was below the word "Tanzania" and displayed the bearer's name (ibid.). In the centre of the cover was the national emblem. On page three of this passport there were spaces for the bearer's photograph and that of the bearer's spouse (ibid, T3).

This response was prepared after researching publicly accessible information currently available to the DIRB within time constraints. This response is not, and does not purport to be, conclusive as to the merit of any particular claim to refugee status or asylum.

References

High Commission for the United Republic of Tanzania, Ottawa. 2 May 1992. Telephone interview with an official.

Passport Handbook to Check the Authenticity of Passports (with current amendments). 1987. Vol. 2. Utrecht: Kluwerpers.

Copyright notice: This document is published with the permission of the copyright holder and producer Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada (IRB). The original version of this document may be found on the offical website of the IRB at http://www.irb-cisr.gc.ca/en/. Documents earlier than 2003 may be found only on Refworld.

Search Refworld