Last Updated: Friday, 26 December 2014, 13:50 GMT

Ghana: The chieftancy in Nsoatre, Brong-Ahafo Region: the tradition of chieftancy rotation among the Twabiri, Nsesreso and the Abuom; the clan currently holding the chieftancy; reports of a conflict in March 2001 over the installation of a new chief

Publisher Canada: Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada
Author Research Directorate, Immigration and Refugee Board, Canada
Publication Date 2 October 2002
Citation / Document Symbol GHA39903.E
Reference 4
Cite as Canada: Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada, Ghana: The chieftancy in Nsoatre, Brong-Ahafo Region: the tradition of chieftancy rotation among the Twabiri, Nsesreso and the Abuom; the clan currently holding the chieftancy; reports of a conflict in March 2001 over the installation of a new chief , 2 October 2002, GHA39903.E , available at: http://www.refworld.org/docid/3f7d4d9838.html [accessed 27 December 2014]
DisclaimerThis is not a UNHCR publication. UNHCR is not responsible for, nor does it necessarily endorse, its content. Any views expressed are solely those of the author or publisher and do not necessarily reflect those of UNHCR, the United Nations or its Member States.

According to reports found among the sources consulted by the Research Directorate, three citizens of Nsoatre city in Brong-Ahafo Region were killed on 5 March 2001 during the installation of a new chief (Ghanaian Chronicle 22 Mar. 2001; ibid. 17 Jan. 2002; Country Reports 2001 4 Mar. 2002). Those who died were reportedly Pastor Kyei Awuah (pastor of the Nsoatre branch of the African Faith Tabernacle Church), Ofori Gyau and Nyamekye (Ghanaian Chronicle 22 Mar. 2001). In addition, nine people were injured when police allegedly fired "indiscriminately" at local residents who had assembled to observe the installation ceremony (Country Reports 2001 4 Mar. 2002).

According to the Ghanaian Chronicle, "the bloody incident occurred during the [installation] ceremony of Prof. Oppong-Boachie, director of the Centre for Scientific Research into Plant Medicine at Mampong Akuapem, as Omanhene of the area" (22 Mar. 2001). An omanhene, according to the Marshall University Website that hosts a section on "The Akan Chief", is "the chief of the state" (10 Apr. 2002). In addition, within Akan political organization, an abusua panyin is the head of the family or clan, an odekuro is the village or town chief, and the ohene is a sub-chief (ibid.).

Although the reports do not indicate which clan Professor Oppong-Boachie belongs to, "the Twabiri royal family and a section of the residents [were] fiercely opposed to Prof. Boa[chie] as [chief] of the area" since he is reportedly not a member of a royal family and therefore unqualified to become a chief (Ghanaian Chronicle 22 Mar. 2001). However, "despite the recalcitrancy of the Professor and his supporters, who were and are still a small minority, the people of Nsoatre decided to keep quiet and ... observe the outdooring" (ibid. 17 Jan. 2002). The police, who were called in to oversee the installation, "opened fire" on what had been reportedly a peaceful gathering of residents (ibid.). Another source states, however, that some of the residents who were allegedly armed returned fire (Country Reports 2001 4 Mar. 2002).

Immediately following the incident, members of the Concerned Citizens Association of Nsoatre (CCAN) called for an investigation to be conducted by the government (Ghanaian Chronicle 17 Jan. 2002; ibid. 22 Mar. 2001). Information on an investigation being conducted could not be found among the sources consulted by the Research Directorate.

The following more recent information may be of interest. A 6 February 2002 article reports on "the mounting of tension" in the city of Nsoatre following the death of one person which is "suspected to be linked to a chieftaincy dispute in the town between two royal clans: the Twabiri family and the Nsesreso family" (GBC).

No information on the tradition of chieftancy rotation among the Twabiri, Nsesreso and the Abuom could be found among the sources consulted by the Research Directorate.

This Response was prepared after researching publicly accessible information currently available to the Research Directorate within time constraints. This Response is not, and does not purport to be, conclusive as to the merit of any particular claim to refugee status or asylum. Please find below the list of additional sources consulted in researching this Information Request.

References

Country Reports on Human Rights Practices for 2001. 4 March 2002. United States Department of State. Washington, DC. [Accessed 30 Sept. 2002]

Ghanaian Chronicle [Nsoatre]. 17 January 2002. George Antwi. "Nsoatre Concerned Citizens Petition JAK." [Accessed 1 Oct. 2002]

_____. 22 March 2001. "Ghana; Police Gun Down 3 Persons ... Bereaved Family Protest." (Africa News/NEXIS)

Gibraltar Broadcasting Corporation (GBC) [Accra]. 6 February 2002. "Ghana: Curfew Imposed in Western Town After Suspected Chieftancy Dispute." (Global News Wire - Asia Africa Intelligence Wire/NEXIS)

Marshall University. 10 April 2002. "Akan Ohene - The Akan Chief (King)." [Accessed 1 Oct. 2002]

Additional Sources Consulted

IRB Databases

NEXIS

Internet sites including:

Africa Confidential

Africa Online

AllAfrica.com

BBC Africa

Ghana Review

Ghanaweb.com

Integrated Regional Information Network (IRIN)

News in Ghana

U.S. Department of State

World News Connection (WNC)

World Press Review

Search engines including:

Google

Copyright notice: This document is published with the permission of the copyright holder and producer Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada (IRB). The original version of this document may be found on the offical website of the IRB at http://www.irb-cisr.gc.ca/en/. Documents earlier than 2003 may be found only on Refworld.

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