Last Updated: Tuesday, 23 September 2014, 16:29 GMT

Journalists Killed in 2012 - Motive Confirmed: Mohamed Quratem

Publisher Committee to Protect Journalists
Publication Date 18 December 2012
Cite as Committee to Protect Journalists, Journalists Killed in 2012 - Motive Confirmed: Mohamed Quratem, 18 December 2012, available at: http://www.refworld.org/docid/5107a0afc.html [accessed 24 September 2014]
DisclaimerThis is not a UNHCR publication. UNHCR is not responsible for, nor does it necessarily endorse, its content. Any views expressed are solely those of the author or publisher and do not necessarily reflect those of UNHCR, the United Nations or its Member States.

Enab Baladi
November 28, 2012, in Darya, Syria

Quratem, a reporter for the pro-opposition weekly Enab Baladi (The Grapes of My Country), was killed in government shelling of the Damascus suburb of Darya on November 28, according to his employer and the pan-Arab news channel Al-Arabiya. Quratem and two local activists, Marwan Shurbaji and Abd al-Rahim Shurbaji, died when a mortar shell fell on the building in which he was working, Eiad Shurbaji, a relative of the killed activists and an exiled Syrian journalist, told CPJ. The three bodies were not discovered until November 30 because of continuous shelling and the large amount of rubble, Shurbaji said.

Quratem was a founding member of Enab Baladi, which began publishing in January 2012 with a focus on the country's civil war. Darya had been under heavy government bombardment since early November 2012, according to news reports. Most people fled when the government offensive began, but Quratem stayed behind to document the siege and work with local and international media outlets to get news out of the city, Enab Baladi reported.

Medium:Print
Job:Print Reporter
Beats Covered:War
Gender:Male
Local or Foreign:Local
Freelance:No
Type of Death:Crossfire/Combat-Related
Suspected Source of Fire:Military Officials
Copyright notice: © Committee to Protect Journalists. All rights reserved. Articles may be reproduced only with permission from CPJ.

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