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Attacks on the Press in 2004 - Malaysia

Publisher Committee to Protect Journalists
Publication Date February 2005
Cite as Committee to Protect Journalists, Attacks on the Press in 2004 - Malaysia, February 2005, available at: http://www.refworld.org/docid/47c566e323.html [accessed 23 July 2014]
DisclaimerThis is not a UNHCR publication. UNHCR is not responsible for, nor does it necessarily endorse, its content. Any views expressed are solely those of the author or publisher and do not necessarily reflect those of UNHCR, the United Nations or its Member States.

2004 Documented Cases – Malaysia

JUNE 1, 2004
Posted: June 4, 2004

Minn Kyaw, Burma Media Link
HARASSED

Kyaw, a Burmese journalist and pro-democracy activist living in Malaysia, was detained and harassed by people who claimed to be security officials, according to international news reports.

Kyaw, the editor of the Burmese-language news magazine Burma Media Link, was driving to the airport in Kuala Lumpur to cover the arrival of Burmese Prime Minister Khin Nyunt when two unmarked vehicles forced his car off the road. His wife, Yussra Shahril, was also in the car. According to an account that Kyaw and Shahril gave to local journalists, three men who identified themselves as security agents, approached the car, handcuffed Kyaw, and dragged him from the car, placing a black hood over his head.

The men drove Kyaw to an unknown location, where they put him in a large, windowless container and removed his hood. A woman accompanied by four men questioned him there. Her questions focused on Burma Media Link and Kyaw's pro-democracy activism. She asked Kyaw why he wrote only negative things about Burma. The men assaulted Kyaw several times during the interrogation, and one accused Kyaw of being a spy.

The group threatened Kyaw, warning him not to tell anyone about his detention, and released him several hours later, after Khin Nyunt had left the country.

Burma Media Link's audience includes Burmese communities in Malaysia and other countries in Southeast Asia. The magazine often publishes commentary critical of Burmese authorities.

During Kyaw's detention, his wife filed a police report alleging that the Malaysian Special Branch, which acts as the country's internal security agency, was involved in her husband's abduction. Superintendent Jamshah Mustapa, a police spokesman, denied any police knowledge or involvement and said the police are investigating the incident, according to news reports.

After his release, Kyaw filed a police complaint and submitted a report to Malaysia's official Human Rights Commission requesting an investigation and protection by Malaysian authorities.

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