China: The "South China Youth Party," which allegedly sought to register as an official political party in Guangzhou in 2002 (2002-2005)

Publisher Canada: Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada
Author Research Directorate, Immigration and Refugee Board, Ottawa
Publication Date 7 October 2005
Citation / Document Symbol CHN100641.E
Reference 2
Cite as Canada: Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada, China: The "South China Youth Party," which allegedly sought to register as an official political party in Guangzhou in 2002 (2002-2005), 7 October 2005, CHN100641.E, available at: http://www.refworld.org/docid/440ed6e05.html [accessed 18 December 2017]
DisclaimerThis is not a UNHCR publication. UNHCR is not responsible for, nor does it necessarily endorse, its content. Any views expressed are solely those of the author or publisher and do not necessarily reflect those of UNHCR, the United Nations or its Member States.

Information on an organization called the "South China Youth Party" could not be found among the sources consulted by the Research Directorate. However, the following information may be of interest.

The communications director at the New York-based Human Rights in China (HRIC) commented that while there are groups operating in China as "nascent political parties," they would not likely register with the authorities, even as parties friendly towards the Chinese Communist Party (CCP), given the "sweep of the China Democratic Party [CDP]" by the authorities (HRIC 4 Oct. 2005). In 1998, the CDP was the first political party to attempt, and fail, to register as an opposition party, a move that resulted in the arrests and imprisonment of its key leaders (Political Parties of the World 2005, 128; Country Reports 2004, Secs. 2, 3). Leaders of "dissident" political parties other than the CDP have also reportedly been detained by authorities (Political Handbook of the World: 2000-2002 2002, 225). Country Reports on Human Rights Practices for 2004 indicates that, though "[n]o laws or regulations specifically govern the formation of political parties ... the CCP retained a monopoly on political power and forbade the creation of new political parties" (28 Feb. 2005, Secs. 2, 3). Other sources note the existence of eight minority parties under the leadership of the CCP (Political Handbook of the World: 2000-2002 2002, 225; Political Parties of the World 2005, 127), to which are allocated roughly seven per cent of the seats in the National People's Congress (ibid.).

This Response was prepared after researching publicly accessible information currently available to the Research Directorate within time constraints. This Response is not, and does not purport to be, conclusive as to the merit of any particular claim for refugee protection. Please find below the list of additional sources consulted in researching this Information Request.

References

Country Reports on Human Rights Practices for 2004. 28 February 2005. "China." United States Department of State. Washington, DC.

Human Rights in China (HRIC). 4 October 2005. Correspondence from the communications director.

Political Handbook of the World: 2000 – 2002. 2002. Edited by Arthur S. Banks, Thomas C. Muller. Binghamton, NY: CSA Publications.

Political Parties of the World. 2005. 6th Edition. Edited by Bogdan Szajkowski. London: John Harper Publishing.

Additional Sources Consulted

Internet sites, including: All-China Youth Federation, Amnesty International, China Internet Information Center, Chinese Communist Youth League, Dui Hua Foundation.

Copyright notice: This document is published with the permission of the copyright holder and producer Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada (IRB). The original version of this document may be found on the offical website of the IRB at http://www.irb-cisr.gc.ca/en/. Documents earlier than 2003 may be found only on Refworld.

Search Refworld

Countries