Iran: Information on whether proxy marriages exist in Iran, and if so, on the procedures, steps and details of a proxy marriage

Publisher Canada: Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada
Author Research Directorate, Immigration and Refugee Board, Canada
Publication Date 1 July 1996
Citation / Document Symbol IRN24285.E
Cite as Canada: Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada, Iran: Information on whether proxy marriages exist in Iran, and if so, on the procedures, steps and details of a proxy marriage, 1 July 1996, IRN24285.E, available at: http://www.refworld.org/docid/3ae6abf48.html [accessed 24 October 2017]
DisclaimerThis is not a UNHCR publication. UNHCR is not responsible for, nor does it necessarily endorse, its content. Any views expressed are solely those of the author or publisher and do not necessarily reflect those of UNHCR, the United Nations or its Member States.

 

The following information was provided in a telephone interview on 4 July 1996 by a professor of anthropology at Concordia University in Montreal. Proxy marriages do exist in Iran, in fact they have become more common in the last ten years as expatriate Iranian men, who may face difficulties returning to Iran, seek Iranian wives. The ceremony can be conducted without the bride, or the groom, or, in some cases, both bride and groom may be absent. Usually it is the father of the absent party who signs the marriage contract. The marriage is officially registered in a government department by the marriage officer who performed the ceremony. This officer is usually, although not necessarily, a Mullah. The groom normally obtains a copy of the marriage contract, and, if requested the bride will also be given a copy.

This Response was prepared after researching publicly accessible information currently available to the DIRB within time constraints. This Response is not, and does not purport to be, conclusive as to the merit of any particular claim to refugee status or asylum.

Reference

Concordia University, Montréal 4 July 1996. Telephone interview with a professor of anthropology specializing in Iran and Egypt.

Copyright notice: This document is published with the permission of the copyright holder and producer Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada (IRB). The original version of this document may be found on the offical website of the IRB at http://www.irb-cisr.gc.ca/en/. Documents earlier than 2003 may be found only on Refworld.

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