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Kazakhstan: Whether there are nationalist groups in Kazakhstan; whether they target minority religions, in particular, Pentecostals (1992-2003)

Publisher Canada: Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada
Author Research Directorate, Immigration and Refugee Board, Canada
Publication Date 22 January 2003
Citation / Document Symbol KKT40464.E
Reference 2
Cite as Canada: Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada, Kazakhstan: Whether there are nationalist groups in Kazakhstan; whether they target minority religions, in particular, Pentecostals (1992-2003), 22 January 2003, KKT40464.E, available at: http://www.refworld.org/docid/3f7d4dbd23.html [accessed 26 December 2014]
DisclaimerThis is not a UNHCR publication. UNHCR is not responsible for, nor does it necessarily endorse, its content. Any views expressed are solely those of the author or publisher and do not necessarily reflect those of UNHCR, the United Nations or its Member States.

Information on nationalist groups further to that provided in KKT34447.E of 17 May 2000, KKT34446.E of 16 May 2000, KKT22376.E of 17 January 1996, and KKT20456.E of 27 April 1995 was scarce among the sources consulted by the Research Directorate.

According to a socio-political overview of Kazakhstan covering developments from 1993 to 1998, President Nazarbayev banned demonstrations by nationalist groups and though he has permitted free speech and the freedom of assembly, he has denied it to "Russian Cossacks who have called for Russia's annexation of northern Kazakhstan and Kazakh extremists who have called for the expulsion of all non-Muslims from Kazakhstan" (Microsoft Encarta Encyclopedia 99).

Moreover, a 31 October 2002 article in the Economist maintains that "nationalist movements have only modest support" in Kazakhstan and extremist Russian and Cossack groups "have been crushed".

No additional information on whether nationalist groups target minority religions, in particular, Pentecostals, could be found among the sources consulted by the Research Directorate.

This Response was prepared after researching publicly accessible information currently available to the Research Directorate within time constraints. This Response is not, and does not purport to be, conclusive as to the merit of any particular claim to refugee status or asylum. Please find below the list of additional sources consulted in researching this Information Request.

References

The Economist. 31 October 2002. "Political Forces: Parties Are for the Most Part Presidential Creations." [Accessed 20 Jan. 2003]

Microsoft Encarta Encyclopedia 99. 1999. "Kazakhstan." [Accessed 20 Jan. 2003]

Additional Sources Consulted

IRB Databases

LEXIS/NEXIS

Internet sites, including:

Amnesty International

BBC Monitoring

Central Asia and the Caucasus, Center for Social and Political Studies (Sweden)

Central Asia Mirror

EurasiaNet

Human Rights Watch

NewsTrove.com

Radio Free Europe

UNESCO

World News Connection

Search Engines:

Google

REESWeb

Copyright notice: This document is published with the permission of the copyright holder and producer Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada (IRB). The original version of this document may be found on the offical website of the IRB at http://www.irb-cisr.gc.ca/en/. Documents earlier than 2003 may be found only on Refworld.

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