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Iran/Norway/Yugoslavia: Nationality of child born in Norway to Yugoslav father and an Iranian mother

Publisher Canada: Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada
Author Research Directorate, Immigration and Refugee Board, Canada
Publication Date 1 May 1999
Citation / Document Symbol ZZZ31881.E
Cite as Canada: Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada, Iran/Norway/Yugoslavia: Nationality of child born in Norway to Yugoslav father and an Iranian mother, 1 May 1999, ZZZ31881.E, available at: http://www.refworld.org/docid/3ae6ac7d5b.html [accessed 25 July 2014]
DisclaimerThis is not a UNHCR publication. UNHCR is not responsible for, nor does it necessarily endorse, its content. Any views expressed are solely those of the author or publisher and do not necessarily reflect those of UNHCR, the United Nations or its Member States.

 

According to Article 8 of the Yugoslav Citizenship Law of 1996, which came into force on 1 January 1997:

(1) The Yugoslav citizenship is acquired by origin by a child born abroad, whose one of the parents at the moment of child's birth is a Yugoslav citizen, and the other is a foreign citizen, if it is registered until its 18th year as a Yugoslav citizen with the competent diplomatic or consular representation office of Yugoslavia and if it submits a request for registration into the registry of Yugoslav citizens.

(2) Request for registration of a child into the registry of Yugoslav citizens may be made by a parent who is a Yugoslav citizen. If a child is under guardianship, the application may be lodged by a guardian. If a child is over the age of 14, its consent is required.

(3) A child born abroad, whose one parent at the moment of child's birth is a Yugoslav citizen, and which remains without citizenship, acquires a Yugoslav citizenship although not registered as a Yugoslav citizen, i.e. registered in the registry of Yugoslav citizens, pursuant to para 1 of the present article.

In response to a question as to whether a child born in Norway to foreign nationals would automatically attain Norwegian citizenship, the Royal Norwegian Embassy in Ottawa stated in 12 May 1999 correspondence that he/she would not since "Norwegian law is based on the principle of descent, which means that children inherit their parents' citizenship."

In regard to the possibility of the child holding Iranian citizenship, the Consul of the Embassy of the Islamic Republic of Iran in Ottawa stated in a 11 March 1997 telephone interview that a child born outside Iran to an Iranian mother and a foreign father would not be an Iranian citizen until the age of 18 years, at which time he/she would have the right to apply for Iranian citizenship.

This Response was prepared after researching publicly accessible information currently available to the Research Directorate within time constraints. This Response is not, and does not purport to be, conclusive as to the merit of any particular claim to refugee status or asylum.

References

Embassy of the Islamic Republic of Iran, Ottawa. 11 March 1997. Telephone interview with Consul. (cited in IRN26514.E of 11 March 1997)

Royal Norwegian Embassy, Ottawa. 12 May 1999. Correspondence from Visa section.

Federal Republic of Yugoslavia, Belgrade. 19 July 1996. Yugoslav Citizenship Law 1996. 19 July 1996.

Copyright notice: This document is published with the permission of the copyright holder and producer Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada (IRB). The original version of this document may be found on the offical website of the IRB at http://www.irb-cisr.gc.ca/en/. Documents earlier than 2003 may be found only on Refworld.

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