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Djibouti: Treatment of homosexuals by society and government authorities; legal recourse and protection available to homosexuals who have been subject to ill-treatment (2004-2007)

Publisher Canada: Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada
Author Research Directorate, Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada, Ottawa
Publication Date 26 February 2007
Citation / Document Symbol DJI102430.E
Cite as Canada: Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada, Djibouti: Treatment of homosexuals by society and government authorities; legal recourse and protection available to homosexuals who have been subject to ill-treatment (2004-2007), 26 February 2007, DJI102430.E, available at: http://www.refworld.org/docid/469cd6b62.html [accessed 21 December 2014]
DisclaimerThis is not a UNHCR publication. UNHCR is not responsible for, nor does it necessarily endorse, its content. Any views expressed are solely those of the author or publisher and do not necessarily reflect those of UNHCR, the United Nations or its Member States.

Homosexuality is illegal in Djibouti (AI July 2006; Canada 20 Dec. 2006; UK 15 Nov. 2006). In an 18 October 2004 article, Behind the Mask (BTM), "a non-profit media organisation publishing a news website intended for gay and lesbian affairs in Africa" (BTM n.d.), indicates that public attitudes and laws concerning homosexuality in Djibouti are "far from liberal" and that this is perhaps as a result of the influence of Islamic law in the country (ibid. 18 Oct. 2004). Cited in the article, a homosexual man from Djibouti states that although there are many gay and lesbian persons living in Djibouti, they live "undercover, unconfident and in fear" (ibid.). The man also notes that there is no organization in Djibouti to support the rights of gays and lesbians in the country (ibid.).

Additional information on the treatment of homosexuals in Djibouti could not be found among the sources consulted by the Research Directorate within the time constraints of this Response.

Information on legal recourse and protection available to homosexuals who have been subject to ill-treatment could not be found among the sources consulted by the Research Directorate within the time constraints of this Response.

This Response was prepared after researching publicly accessible information currently available to the Research Directorate within time constraints. This Response is not, and does not purport to be, conclusive as to the merit of any particular claim for refugee protection. Please find below the list of additional sources consulted in researching this Information Request.

References

Amnesty International (AI). July 2006. Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Network. "Sexual Minorities and the Law: A World Survey." [Accessed 31 Jan. 2007]

Behind The Mask (BTM). 18 October 2004. "Illiberal Attitudes." [Accessed 31 Jan. 2007]
_____ . N.d. "Who We Are: History of Behind the Mask." [Accessed 8 Feb. 2007]

Canada. 20 December 2006. Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada. "Travel Report: Djibouti." [Accessed 8 Feb. 2007]

United Kingdom (UK). 15 November 2006. Foreign & Commonwealth Office. "Travel Advice By Country: Djibouti." [Accessed 31 Jan. 2007]

Additional Sources Consulted

Oral sources: Behind The Mask (BTM), Gays and Lesbians in Foreign Affairs Agencies (GLIFAA), Human Rights Watch (HRW) – LGBT division and Women Living Under Muslim Laws (WLUML) did not provide information within the time constraints of this Reponse.

Internet sites, including: Afrol.com, AllAfrica, Amnesty International (AI), Asylumlaw.org, British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC), European Country of Origin Information Network (ecoi.net), Factiva, Freedom House, Gay.com, Gay Times [London], GlobalGayz.com, Human Rights Watch (HRW), Integrated Regional Information Networks (IRIN), International Gay and Lesbian Human Rights Commission (IGLHRC), International Lesbian and Gay Association (ILGA), Pambazuka, SodomyLaws.org, Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR), United States Department of State, Women Living Under Muslim Laws (WLUML).

Copyright notice: This document is published with the permission of the copyright holder and producer Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada (IRB). The original version of this document may be found on the offical website of the IRB at http://www.irb-cisr.gc.ca/en/. Documents earlier than 2003 may be found only on Refworld.

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