Last Updated: Friday, 25 July 2014, 12:52 GMT

Lebanon/United Arab Emirates: Whether a person can settle in Lebanon if his or her travel documents were issued by the Lebanese authorities, even though the person has never lived in that country but was born and has always lived in the United Arab Emirates, for example, because his or her Lebanese parents work there and renew their work permits every two years (2002-Nov. 2004)

Publisher Canada: Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada
Author Research Directorate, Immigration and Refugee Board, Canada
Publication Date 5 November 2004
Citation / Document Symbol ZZZ43053.FE
Reference 7
Cite as Canada: Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada, Lebanon/United Arab Emirates: Whether a person can settle in Lebanon if his or her travel documents were issued by the Lebanese authorities, even though the person has never lived in that country but was born and has always lived in the United Arab Emirates, for example, because his or her Lebanese parents work there and renew their work permits every two years (2002-Nov. 2004), 5 November 2004, ZZZ43053.FE, available at: http://www.refworld.org/docid/42df61d62.html [accessed 26 July 2014]
DisclaimerThis is not a UNHCR publication. UNHCR is not responsible for, nor does it necessarily endorse, its content. Any views expressed are solely those of the author or publisher and do not necessarily reflect those of UNHCR, the United Nations or its Member States.

A spokesperson from the Embassy of Lebanon in Ottawa provided the following information during a 4 November 2004 telephone interview.

A person who does not have Lebanese citizenship but whose travel documents were issued by the Lebanese authorities may not necessarily settle in Lebanon. Although stateless Palestinians who have lived in Lebanon before have the right to return and live there, people who are not Lebanese and who have never lived in Lebanon cannot automatically settle there.

A person born in the United Arab Emirates and whose parents are not Lebanese citizens but rather are Palestinians who once lived in Lebanon can also go and live in Lebanon, provided that the parents register the person with the Palestinian authorities in Lebanon.

The spokesperson also said that a person whose parents are Lebanese citizens is also considered a Lebanese citizen, regardless of where the person was born. Citizenship Laws of the World, a summary of citizenship laws published in March 2001 by the U.S. Office of Personnel Management Investigations Service, corroborated this information, indicating that a person born of a Lebanese father is considered a Lebanese citizen. However, Lebanese children born outside Lebanon must be registered at a Lebanese embassy in order to obtain Lebanese citizenship (United States March 2001).

This Response was prepared after researching publicly accessible information currently available to the Research Directorate within time constraints. This Response is not, and does not purport to be, conclusive as to the merit of any particular claim for refugee protection.

References

Embassy of Lebannon in Ottawa. 4 November 2004. Telephone interview with a spokesperson.

United States. March 2001. Office of Personnel Management Investigations Service. Citizenship Laws of the World. [Accessed 4 Nov. 2004]

Copyright notice: This document is published with the permission of the copyright holder and producer Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada (IRB). The original version of this document may be found on the offical website of the IRB at http://www.irb-cisr.gc.ca/en/. Documents earlier than 2003 may be found only on Refworld.

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