Last Updated: Wednesday, 09 July 2014, 13:04 GMT

Russia/Hungary: Whether Russia and Hungary have a treaty that allows dual citizenship

Publisher Canada: Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada
Author Research Directorate, Immigration and Refugee Board, Canada
Publication Date 27 January 2004
Citation / Document Symbol ZZZ42295.E
Reference 2
Cite as Canada: Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada, Russia/Hungary: Whether Russia and Hungary have a treaty that allows dual citizenship, 27 January 2004, ZZZ42295.E, available at: http://www.refworld.org/docid/403dd2290.html [accessed 10 July 2014]
DisclaimerThis is not a UNHCR publication. UNHCR is not responsible for, nor does it necessarily endorse, its content. Any views expressed are solely those of the author or publisher and do not necessarily reflect those of UNHCR, the United Nations or its Member States.

In correspondence to the Research Directorate on 13 January 2004, the Consul at the Embassy of the Republic of Hungary indicated that there exists no treaty that allows dual citizenship with Russia, a statement that was corroborated by the Embassy of the Russian Federation (19 Jan. 2004).

Notwithstanding the lack of a formal treaty, the Consul of Hungary mentioned that Act LV of 1993 on Hungarian Citizenship allows any Hungarian to hold dual citizenship, and one who wishes to affirm his or her Hungarian citizenship is not obligated to renounce the citizenship of any other country (Hungary 13 Jan. 2004).

On the other hand, a spokesman for the Russian Embassy's consular division maintained that one who becomes a Russian citizen must renounce his or her former citizenship (23 Jan. 2004). Article 6.1 of the Federal Law on Russian Federation Citizenship states that:

a citizen of the Russian Federation who also has another citizenship shall be deemed by the Russian Federation only as a Russian Federation citizen, except for the cases stipulated by an international treaty of the Russian Federation or a federal law. (RF 31 May 2002)

Among the numerous requirements stipulated by Article 13.1, which explains how a foreign citizen may apply to become a citizen of the Russian Federation, subsection (d) maintains that an applicant for naturalization:

[must] have filed applications with the competent body of foreign state whereby they waived their other citizenship. No waiver of foreign citizenship is required if this is envisaged by an international treaty of the Russian Federation or the present Federal Law or if the waiver of another citizenship is impossible due to reasons beyond the person's control. (ibid.)

However, Article 6.2 also states that "the acquisition by a Russian Federation citizen of another citizenship shall not cause termination of Russian Federation citizenship" (ibid.).

This Response was prepared after researching publicly accessible information currently available to the Research Directorate within time constraints. This Response is not, and does not purport to be, conclusive as to the merit of any particular claim to refugee status or asylum. Please find below the list of additional sources consulted in researching this Information Request.

References

Embassy of the Republic of Hungary, consular section. 13 January 2004. Correspondence from the Consul.

Embassy of the Embassy of the Russian Federation, consular division. 23 January 2004. Telephone interview with Vice Consul.
_____. 19 January 2004. Correspondence.

Russian Federation (RF). 31 May 2002. "Federal Law on Russian Federation Citizenship."

Copyright notice: This document is published with the permission of the copyright holder and producer Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada (IRB). The original version of this document may be found on the offical website of the IRB at http://www.irb-cisr.gc.ca/en/. Documents earlier than 2003 may be found only on Refworld.

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