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Central African Republic: The names of the children of Ange-Félix Patassé, former president of the Central African Republic; whether his children are specifically targeted by the current government authorities (1996 - September 2005)

Publisher Canada: Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada
Author Research Directorate, Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada, Ottawa
Publication Date 23 September 2005
Citation / Document Symbol CAF100589.FE
Reference 2
Cite as Canada: Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada, Central African Republic: The names of the children of Ange-Félix Patassé, former president of the Central African Republic; whether his children are specifically targeted by the current government authorities (1996 - September 2005), 23 September 2005, CAF100589.FE, available at: http://www.refworld.org/docid/45f1470516.html [accessed 13 July 2014]
DisclaimerThis is not a UNHCR publication. UNHCR is not responsible for, nor does it necessarily endorse, its content. Any views expressed are solely those of the author or publisher and do not necessarily reflect those of UNHCR, the United Nations or its Member States.

According to an Agence France-Presse (AFP) article on the funeral of Lucienne Patassé, who died on 29 July 2000, the first wife (Africa Confidential 6 Mar. 1998, 7) of the former president of the Central African Republic had seven children, four girls and three boys, with Ange-Félix Patassé, from whom she had been separated for many years (10 Aug. 2000). The article, however, made no mention of the children's names (AFP 10 Aug. 2000). Another source, likewise without specifying names, reported that Lucienne Patassé's children and grandchildren, who were living in Canada and France at the time of her death, were expected to attend the funeral (Sangonet 30 July 2000).

A Jeune Afrique/L'Intelligent article on the overthrow of former Central African president Ange-Félix Patassé, entitled "La Chute de l'Ange," recounts that Patassé's second wife, Angèle (Sangonet 30 July 2000), a Togolese (Africa Confidential 6 Mar. 1998, 7), and [translation] "two of his sons" were part of the presidential delegation invited to Niamey, Niger, two days before the coup d'état (Jeune Afrique/L'Intelligent 23-29 Mar. 2003, 19-20; ibid., 22). The article also related that [translation] "Salomon and Providence," the couple's two "young children," remained in Bangui, Central African Republic, during the upheaval (ibid., 21).

None of the names of former president Patassé's other children could be found among the sources consulted by the Research Directorate, nor could information on whether his children are specifically targeted by the current government authorities.

This Response was prepared after researching publicly accessible information currently available to the Research Directorate within time constraints. This Response is not, and does not purport to be, conclusive as to the merit of any particular claim for refugee protection. Please find below the list of additional sources consulted in researching this Information Request.

References

Africa Confidential [London]. 6 March 1998. Vol. 39, No. 5. "Central African Republic: Patassé's Problems."

Agence France-Presse (AFP). 10 August 2000. "Obsèques nationales de Lucienne Patassé." (Sangonet) [Accessed 15 Sept. 2005]

Jeune Afrique/L'Intelligent [Paris]. 23-29 March 2003. No. 2202. François Soudan. "La Chute de l'Ange."

Sangonet. 30 July 2000. Victor Bissengue. "Madame Lucienne PATASSE est décédée le samedi 29 juillet 2000 2H à Bangui." [Accessed 15 Sept. 2005]

Additional Sources Consulted

Publications: Africa Research Bulletin, Keesing's Record of World Events, Resource Centre country file.

Internet sites, including: AllAfrica, Amnesty International, BBC Africa, Europa World Year Book, European Country of Origin Information Network (ECOI.net), Human Rights Watch (HRW), International Crisis Group (ICG), International Federation for Human Rights (FIDH), The International Who's Who, IRIN, MISNA, ReliefWeb, United States Department of State.

Copyright notice: This document is published with the permission of the copyright holder and producer Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada (IRB). The original version of this document may be found on the offical website of the IRB at http://www.irb-cisr.gc.ca/en/. Documents earlier than 2003 may be found only on Refworld.

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