Title Protocol Additional to the Geneva Conventions of 12 August 1949, and relating to the Adoption of an Additional Distinctive Emblem (Protocol III)
Publisher International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC)
Publication Date 8 December 2005
Topics International humanitarian law (IHL) / Geneva Conventions | Treaties / Agreements / Charters / Protocols / Conventions / Declarations
Reference Not yet entered into force
Cite as International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC), Protocol Additional to the Geneva Conventions of 12 August 1949, and relating to the Adoption of an Additional Distinctive Emblem (Protocol III), 8 December 2005, available at: http://www.refworld.org/docid/43de21774.html [accessed 18 April 2014]
Comments The new emblem is commonly referred to as the "red crystal". See for list of ratifications: http://www.eda.admin.ch/eda/f/home/foreign/ intagr/train/iprotection.ContentPar.0008. UpFile.tmp/mt_060119_geprotIII_f.pdf The adoption of the Protocol by the Diplomatic Conference was put to a vote. According to the unofficial count, 98 States of the 144 States present at the Diplomatic Conference in Geneva in December 2005, voted in favour of the Protocol, 10 States abstained and 27 voted against. In the week after its adoption on 8 December, 27 States signed the Protocol. Now that the Protocol has been adopted, it will be necessary to adapt the Statutes of the International Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement so that the additional emblem can be used within the Movement. Therefore, the Standing Commission of the Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement has decided to call an International Conference of the Red Cross and Red Crescent, which is to take place on 20-21 June, 2006. The International Conference brings together those States that are party to the Geneva Conventions, the International Committee of the Red Cross, the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies and its 183 member Societies. After adaptation of the statutes, it will also be possible to recognize and admit new societies to the Movement.
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